Spring 23 NIGHT SECTION Feb 7: Africana Studies Foundations

Hi everyone,

Expect a new post here every week with full details on what to do. Posts will usually go live on Thursdays.

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE NIGHT SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

First a few housekeeping things before we get to the assignment itself. There’s a lot in this week’s post but there’s a lot to cover. It will be shorter after the first few weeks.

  • You might find it helpful to subscribe to new posts for this site: use the e-mail sign-up form on the main page.
  • If you’re new to the class, welcome! Be sure to carefully review class policies on the syllabus.
  • Get the required course book: Dr. Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies, 4th edition.. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester. You can also buy the book directly from the publisher at the list price. See links on the books page.

Please sign up for the class text message service run by Remind(.com) if you haven’t done so yet

  • You can sign up online here or send a text message to 81010 and type the following as the message: @aas166nite.

General Announcements:

  • Lehman has emergency grants available to quickly provide money for housing, medical, food, transportation, and other needs. Details at the Student Affairs office.
  • The Lehman Food Bank offers food assistance. Details here.
  • Lehman has a very comprehensive page of students resources including laptop/tablet loans. Details here.
  • NY State has reinstated TAP financial aid eligibility for part time students! Details here

Quick highlights from week 1: Tuesday January 31

  • REVIEWED Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (handout and also on the Readings page). What’s his view of a Black Studies methodology (i.e. ways to analyze information and do research) and how should it approach the world?

DO THIS for Tuesday February 7:

There are 3 short PDF readings (total about 28 pages) and one video (20 minutes) for next week.

WATCH Prof. Jeffrey Kaplan’s video on how to read texts to remember and understand information on YouTube. (23 minutes)

(RE)READ Dr. Leonard Jeffries’s essay The Essence of Black Studies.” (PDF on the Readings page if you lost/don’t have it)

READ Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s essay “Africana Studies: A Decade of Change, Challenge, and Conflict” (13 page PDF file on the Readings page)

READ pages 1-16 from chapter 1 in the Introduction to Black Studies textbook (13 page PDF file on the Readings page–POSTED ON WEDNESDAY)

Things to think about while viewing and for discussion

Watch Dr. Kaplan’s video for tips on the process of reading and taking notes. List the key strategies he suggests in your notebook and try them for the readings this week.

Dr. Clarke’s essay was presented at a conference of the African Heritage Studies Association. In this essay, he makes an attempt to trace some of the early history of the discipline (academic major) of Africana Studies and present some of the key issues he thinks it faces.

Dr. Karenga in the textbook chapter places the emergence of Black Studies/Africana Studies within the historical framework of the 1960s movements.

Try to understand the following key points from the essay:

  • What is the issue with naming the major–specifically Black Studies vs Africana Studies?
  • What is the dilemma that Black scholars/writers face?
  • What is the significance of the contributions of W.E.B. Du Bois and Carter G. Woodson?
  • What’s the importance of the search for ideology Dr. Clarke mentions in the last few pages?
  • How does the political climate of the 1960s shape the beginning of Black Studies as an academic discipline?

BRING a copies of Dr. Clarke’s essay and the selected pages from the textbook to class with you.

What’s Next?

We start reading from the Introduction to Black Studies textbook. We’ll start with chapter 1.

Advertisement

NIGHT section week 16: Final class and review

 

https://i0.wp.com/www.geekandspell.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2_THE_EAST_BLACKWDS_WEB.jpg

Image: Detail from X Clan To the East, Blackwards

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE NIGHT SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site

Course Announcements:

  • NIGHT SECTION Final exam is Monday December 19 from 6:15-8:15 PM in usual classroom–in person on campus only. Don’t miss it
  • Our last class meeting is next Monday (12/12)
  • Midterms have been returned to your email address.
  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Mondays/Wednesdays from 4-5 PM on Zoom here or on campus in Carman 291. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. [NO OFFICE HOURS THIS WEDNESDAY. (Even I have to take a break once in a while …)]
  • Spring 2023 Course: For those interested, I’ll be teaching African American History (AAS 245) meeting Monday night on campus.

Quick highlights from Week 15 (12/5)’s class:

  • Reviewed the second half of Chapter 10 on Black Psychology in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • In-class video: Dr. Wade Nobles’s “A Brief History of ABPSi” on YouTube
  • In-class video: Dr. Joy DeGruy’s “Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome” on YouTube (5 minute Intro) / 1 hour 21 minute full presentation
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • Musical intro: Ice-T “Mind Over Matter” (YouTube)
  • News story–
  • RESOURCE: Association of Black Psychologists  Here
  • New York Chapter: ABPSi

DO THIS for week 16–Monday December 12

This class will be a structured review/open Q&A for the final. My prepared presentation will cover the format of our exam itself and a general approach to essay exams. We’ll answer any open questions and collectively brainstorm some approaches. Please bring Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies textbook with you also, since the second half of the class will be a review for the final exam.

Read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF), which will help you begin to prepare for our final (and hopefully others as well). It summarizes much of what is usually in my prep sessions.

Final Exam Info:

Monday December 19 from 6:15-8:15 PM in usual classroom–in person on campus only.

Format: 2 essays on events from second half of semester only. More details forthcoming next week.

Remember the materials to help you review on this website:

  • Scroll through the weekly Course Updates posts for a quick overview of the entire semester’s work (and reading questions)
  • My own Lecture Notes

 

Fall 22 Week 3 DAY SECTION: Africana Studies Foundations

Hi everyone,

Expect a new post here every week with full details on what to do. Posts will usually go live on Thursdays.

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE DAY SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE NIGHT SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

First a few housekeeping things before we get to the assignment itself. There’s a lot in this week’s post but there’s a lot to cover. It will be shorter after the first few weeks.

  • You might find it helpful to subscribe to new posts for this site: use the e-mail sign-up form on the main page.
  • If you’re new to the class, welcome! Be sure to carefully review class policies on the syllabus.
  • Get the required course book: Dr. Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies, 4th edition.. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester. You can also buy the book directly from the publisher at the list price. See links on the books page.

Please sign up for the class text message service run by Remind(.com) if you haven’t done so yet

  • You can sign up online here or send a text message to 757-337-4602 and type the following as the message: @aas166day.

General Announcements:

  • Lehman has emergency grants available to quickly provide money for housing, medical, food, transportation, and other needs. Details at the Student Affairs office.
  • The Lehman Food Bank offers food assistance. Details here.
  • Lehman has a very comprehensive page of students resources including laptop/tablet loans. Details here.
  • NY State has reinstated TAP financial aid eligibility for part time students! Details here

Quick highlights from week 2: Wednesday September 7

  • REVIEWED Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (handout and also on the Readings page). What’s his view of a Black Studies methodology (i.e. ways to analyze information and do research) and how should it approach the world?
  • REVIEWED key points in the A Great and Mighty Walk documentary film

What to do for Week 3–September 12/14:

For Monday September 12:

WATCH Prof. Jeffrey Kaplan’s video on how to read texts to remember and understand information on YouTube. (23 minutes)

READ Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s essay “Africana Studies: A Decade of Change, Challenge, and Conflict” (13 page PDF file on the Readings page)

Things to think about while viewing and for discussion

Watch Dr. Kaplan’s video for tips on the process of reading and taking notes. List the key strategies he suggests in your notebook and try them for the readings this week.

Dr. Clarke’s essay was presented at a conference of the African Heritage Studies Association. In this essay, he makes an attempt to trace some of the early history of the discipline (academic major) of Africana Studies and present some of the key issues he thinks it faces.

Try to understand the following key points from the essay:

  • What is the issue with naming the major–specifically Black Studies vs Africana Studies?
  • What is the dilemma that Black scholars/writers face?
  • What is the significance of the contributions of W.E.B. Du Bois and Carter G. Woodson?
  • What’s the importance of the search for ideology Dr. Clarke mentions in the last few pages?

For Wednesday September 14: [Updated]

BRING a copy of Dr. Clarke’s essay from Monday’s class with you.

READ Dr. Marimba Ani’s chapter from Let the Circle Be Unbroken. PDF on the Readings page. Read it slowly and carefully using some of the reading strategies in Dr. Jeffrey Kaplan’s video you watched over the weekend. You’ll have to read it at least twice. (11 pages.)

Try to understand the following key points and be able to answer them:

  • What worldview?
  • What is the African worldview as defined by Dr. Ani?
  • What is the difference between African and European-based worldview?
  • What’s the significance of complementary pairs in the African worldview?
  • What’s the role of spirit/spirituality in the African worldview?

What’s Next?

We start reading from the Introduction to Black Studies textbook. We’ll start with chapter 1.

Fall 22 Weeks 2-3 NIGHT SECTION: Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s Great and Mighty Walk [UPDATED]

Hi everyone,

Expect a new post here every week with full details on what to do. Posts will usually go live on Thursdays.

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE NIGHT SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

First a few housekeeping things before we get to the assignment itself. There’s a lot in this week’s post but there’s a lot to cover. It will be shorter after the first few weeks.

  • You might find it helpful to subscribe to new posts for this site: use the e-mail sign-up form on the main page.
  • If you’re new to the class, welcome! Be sure to carefully review class policies on the syllabus.
  • Get copies of the required course book: Dr. Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies, 4th edition.. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester. You can also buy the book directly from the publisher at the list price. See links on the books page.

Please sign up for the class text message service run by Remind(.com) if you haven’t done so yet

  • You can sign up online here or send a text message to 757-337-4602 and type the following as the message: @aas166nite.

General Announcements:

  • Lehman has emergency grants available to quickly provide money for housing, medical, food, transportation, and other needs. Details at the Student Affairs office.
  • The Lehman Food Bank offers food assistance. Details here.
  • Lehman has a very comprehensive page of students resources including laptop/tablet loans. Details here.

Audio tour of this website

If you missed the first class session, this short tour of the site and the syllabus should get you up to speed. Also see the FAQ page for more info. This lecture is optional: if you were in the Zoom session or can grasp the website, you can skip it.

[coming this weekend.]

Quick highlights from first week of classes on Monday August 29

  • Course Intro & syllabus overview
  • Reading of Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (handout and also on the Readings page). What’s his view of a Black Studies methodology (i.e. ways to analyze information and do research) and how should it approach the world?
  • News story: new AP course in African American Studies (listen on NPR)
  • Music: Dizzy Gillespie’s “Swing Low Sweet Cadillac” (Listen on YouTube)

NO class on Week 2: Monday September 6 for Labor Day!

What to do for Week 3–Monday September 12:

RE-READ Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (on the Readings page. Password hint: what year is it?).

WATCH the 90-minute documentary embedded below of the late scholar Dr. John Henrik Clarke

READ Dr. Clarke’s essay “Africana Studies: A Decade of Change, Challenge, and Conflict” (PDF file on the Readings page)

RESPOND to the questions at the bottom of this post and write brief answers for discussion in class
Things to think about while viewing and for discussion:

  • What is Dr. Clarke’s view of history and how should we relate to it?
  • Why study ancient African civilizations, especially Kemet and Nile Valley civilization, according to Dr. Clarke?
  • How, according to Dr. Clarke, has the history of Kemet’s contributions to Greek civilization been erased?
  • Consider sharing the link on your social media feed and watching it with friends, family, children or hosting a watch party for your PTA, church group, tenants’ association, etc.

Note: the video takes a sweeping view of history and Dr. Clarke includes an astounding amount of information. Don’t try to take down everything: focus on some key points or maybe a few figures to look at in more detail later. The goal is to gain a broad grasp of a key foundational figure in Africana Studies and think about his approach to history.

Highlight or underline key points in Dr. J’s essay. Write down notes as you read and watch the documentary. Write down questions of things you don’t understand for us to answer in class.

Dr. Clarke’s essay was presented at a conference of the African Heritage Studies Association. In this essay, he makes an attempt to trace some of the early history of the discipline (academic major) of Africana Studies and present some of the key issues he thinks it faces.

Try to understand the following key points from the essay:

  • What is the issue with naming the major–specifically Black Studies vs Africana Studies?
  • What is the dilemma that Black scholars/writers face?
  • What is the significance of the contributions of W.E.B. Du Bois and Carter G. Woodson?
  • What’s the importance of the search for ideology Dr. Clarke mentions in the last few pages?

What’s Next?

We’ll review highlights of the Dr. Clarke documentary, discuss Africana Studies methodology, and revisit Dr. J’s essay.

Fall 22 Week 2 DAY SECTION: Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s Great and Mighty Walk

Hi everyone,

Expect a new post here every week with full details on what to do. Posts will usually go live on Thursdays.

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE DAY SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE NIGHT SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

First a few housekeeping things before we get to the assignment itself. There’s a lot in this week’s post but there’s a lot to cover. It will be shorter after the first few weeks.

  • You might find it helpful to subscribe to new posts for this site: use the e-mail sign-up form on the main page.
  • If you’re new to the class, welcome! Be sure to carefully review class policies on the syllabus.
  • Get copies of the required course book: Dr. Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies, 4th edition.. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester. You can also buy the book directly from the publisher at the list price. See links on the books page.

Please sign up for the class text message service run by Remind(.com) if you haven’t done so yet

  • You can sign up online here or send a text message to (757-337-4602 and type the following as the message: @aas166day.

General Announcements:

  • Lehman has emergency grants available to quickly provide money for housing, medical, food, transportation, and other needs. Details at the Student Affairs office.
  • The Lehman Food Bank offers food assistance. Details here.
  • Lehman has a very comprehensive page of students resources including laptop/tablet loans. Details here.

Audio tour of this website

If you missed the first class session, this short tour of the site and the syllabus should get you up to speed. Also see the FAQ page for more info. This lecture is optional: if you were in the Zoom session or can grasp the website, you can skip it.

[coming this weekend.]

Quick highlights from first week of classes on August 29,31

  • Course Intro & syllabus overview
  • Reading of Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (handout and also on the Readings page). What’s his view of a Black Studies methodology (i.e. ways to analyze information and do research) and how should it approach the world?
  • Screened first ~25 minutes of the Dr. John Henrik Clarke documentary A Great and Mighty Walk. It’s on YouTube if you want a refresher. (Consider sharing the link with your own intro to it on social media. Think about watching it with family members, your church group, tenants’ association, PTA chapter, etc.)

What to do for Week 2–September 7:

NO class on Monday September 6 for Labor Day!

RE-READ Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (on the Readings page. Password hint: what year is it?).

WATCH the 90-minute documentary embedded below of the late scholar Dr. John Henrik Clarke

RESPOND to the questions at the bottom of this post and DISCUSS them with classmates and myself

Things to think about while viewing and for discussion:

  • What is Dr. Clarke’s view of history and how should we relate to it?
  • Why study ancient African civilizations, especially Kemet and Nile Valley civilization, according to Dr. Clarke?
  • How, according to Dr. Clarke, has the history of Kemet’s contributions to Greek civilization been erased?
  • Consider sharing the link on your social media feed and watching it with friends, family, children or hosting a watch party for your PTA, church group, tenants’ association, etc.

Note: the video takes a sweeping view of history and Dr. Clarke includes an astounding amount of information. Don’t try to take down everything: focus on some key points or maybe a few figures to look at in more detail later. The goal is to gain a broad grasp of a key foundational figure in Africana Studies and think about his approach to history.

Highlight or underline key points in Dr. J’s essay. Write down notes as you read and watch the documentary. Write down questions of things you don’t understand for us to answer in class.

What’s Next?

We’ll review highlights of the Dr. Clarke documentary, discuss Africana Studies methodology, and revisit Dr. J’s essay.

Spring 21 Week 2: Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s Great and Mighty Walk

Hi everyone,

Expect a new post here every week with full details on what to do. Posts will usually go live on Thursdays.

First a few housekeeping things before we get to the assignment itself. There’s a lot in this week’s post but there’s a lot to cover. It will be shorter after the first few weeks.

  • You might find it helpful to subscribe to new posts for this site: use the e-mail sign-up form on the main page.
  • If you’re new to the class, welcome! Be sure to carefully review class policies on the syllabus.
  • Get copies of the required course book: Dr. Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies, 4th edition.. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester. You can also buy the book directly from the publisher at the list price. See links on the books page.

Please sign up for the class text message service run by Remind(.com) if you haven’t done so yet

  • You can sign up online here or send a text message to (608) 467-4328 and type the following as the message: @aas166.
  • Makes it easy for me to quickly send out important messages–like today when I was way too sick to run my classes

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • The sessions will be recorded starting next week: still figuring out the best way to post them. Stay tuned.
  • Sign-up info for both Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

General Announcements:

  • Lehman has emergency grants available to quickly provide money for housing, medical, food, transportation, and other needs. Details at the Student Affairs office.
  • The Lehman Food Bank offers food assistance. Details here.
  • Lehman has a very comprehensive page of students resources including laptop/tablet loans. Details here.

Audio tour of this website

If you missed the first class session, this short tour of the site and the syllabus should get you up to speed. Also see the FAQ page for more info. This lecture is optional: if you were in the Zoom session or can grasp the website, you can skip it.

[coming this weekend.]

Quick highlights from first class on 2/3:

  • Course Intro & syllabus overview
  • Zoom wait room music: Archie Shepp’s “New Africa
  • Musical selection: Dizzy Gillespie’s “Swing Low, Sweet Cadillac.”
  • Reading of Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (handout and also on the Readings page). What’s his view of a Black Studies methodology (i.e. ways to analyze information and do research) and how should it approach the world?
  • Screened first ~25 minutes of the Dr. John Henrik Clarke documentary A Great and Mighty Walk. It’s on YouTube if you want a refresher. (Consider sharing the link with your own intro to it on social media. Think about watching it with family members, your church group, tenants’ association, PTA chapter, etc.)

What to do for Week 2–February 8:

RE-READ Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (on the Readings page. Password hint: what year is it?).

WATCH the 90-minute documentary embedded below of the late scholar Dr. John Henrik Clarke

RESPOND to the questions at the bottom of this post and DISCUSS them with classmates and myself

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday February 10

Things to think about while viewing and for discussion:

  • What is Dr. Clarke’s view of history and how should we relate to it?
  • Why study ancient African civilizations, especially Kemet and Nile Valley civilization, according to Dr. Clarke?
  • How, according to Dr. Clarke, has the history of Kemet’s contributions to Greek civilization been erased?
  • Consider sharing the link on your social media feed and watching it with friends, family, children or hosting a watch party for your PTA, church group, tenants’ association, etc.

Note: the video takes a sweeping view of history and Dr. Clarke includes an astounding amount of information. Don’t try to take down everything: focus on some key points or maybe a few figures to look at in more detail later. The goal is to gain a broad grasp of a key foundational figure in Africana Studies and think about his approach to history.

Highlight or underline key points in Dr. J’s essay. Write down notes as you read and watch the documentary. Write down questions of things you don’t understand for us to answer in class.

What’s Next?

We’ll review highlights of the Dr. Clarke documentary, discuss Africana Studies methodology, and revisit Dr. J’s essay.

Comments on posts:

You’ll notice the “Let’s Talk” button is below. Here’s how it’ll work: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week of December 11: Final class and review

https://i0.wp.com/www.geekandspell.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2_THE_EAST_BLACKWDS_WEB.jpg

Image: Detail from X Clan To the East, Blackwards

Announcements:

  • Our last class is next week (12/11)
  • The final exam is on December 18 from 6-8 PM in our usual classroom
  • SAVE THE DATE: the Kwanzaa Celebration in Brooklyn mentioned by Dr. Segun Shabaka in class will be on Sunday December 29 from 4-7 PM at IS 258, 141 Macon St, Brooklyn NY. It is intentionally a family friendly program. You should plan on bringing children and there will be music and an exciting African dance presentation in addition to a talk by Dr. Maulana Karenga (the author of our Introduction to Black Studies textbook). There’s a small admission fee (that you can negotiate if you’re truly broke). Details coming soon at the Int’l African Arts Fest website.

On Wednesday December 11, we’ll have our final class meeting. Please bring Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies textbook with you also, since the second half of the class will be a review for the final exam.

Read the following:

  •  “Can African People Save Themselves?” in Dr. Clarke’s Notes for An African World Revolution (pp. 383-420).
  • The Introduction of Chapter 11 in Introduction to Black Studies on Critical Thinking (pp. 425-429) and “An Ethics of Sharing” (pp. 474-479)

What to read/look for:

  • What challenges does Dr. Clarke pose for the future of African people globally?
  • What are the key points Dr. Karenga suggests are part of the critical thinking process?

Quick highlights from 12/5 class:

  • Thanks to Dr. Segun Shabaka for his guest lecture! See more info on the US Organization at their website. Info on his trips/tours is available at the Pyramid Productions website and info on the annual International African Arts Festival is at their website.

Week of December 12: Final class and review

https://i0.wp.com/www.geekandspell.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2_THE_EAST_BLACKWDS_WEB.jpg

Image: Detail fro X Clan To the East, Blackwards

Announcements:

  • Our last class is next week (12/12)
  • The final exam is on December 19 from 6-8 PM in our usual classroom
  • SAVE THE DATE: the Kwanzaa Celebration in Brooklyn mentioned by Dr. Segun Shabaka in class will be on Saturday September 29 from 4-8 PM at IS 258, 141 Macon St, Brooklyn NY. It is intentionally a family friendly program. You should plan on bringing children and there will be music and an exciting African dance presentation in addition to a talk by Dr. Maulana Karenga. There’s a small admission fee (that you can negotiate if you’re truly broke). Details at their website.

On Wednesday December 12, we’ll have our final class meeting. Please bring Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies textbook with you also, since the second half of the class will be a review for the final exam.

Read the following:

  •  “Can African People Save Themselves?” in Dr. Clarke’s Notes for An African World Revolution (pp. 383-420).
  • The Introduction of Chapter 11 in Introduction to Black Studies on Critical Thinking (pp. 425-429) and “An Ethics of Sharing” (pp. 474-479)

What to read/look for:

  • What challenges does Dr. Clarke pose for the future of African people globally?
  • What are the key points Dr. Karenga suggests are part of the critical thinking process?

Quick highlights from 12/5 class:

  • See the Lecture Notes page for my presentation (coming soon)
  • Reviewed first section of Introduction to Black Studies Chapter 9: “Black Creative Production”
    • Karenga outlines major artistic periods (in the US) and key debates in creative production
  • Reviewed Maulana Karenga essay: “Black Art: Mute Matter Given Form and Function”
    • Dr. Karenga’s argument of hoe Black Artists should approach their craft
  • Reviewed Langston Hughes essay “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain”
    • Hughes’s Harlem Renaissance (1923) argument for the role of the Black artist
  • Reviewed Kenneth Warren’s essay “Does African American Literature Still Exist?”
    • Warren argues that because of assimilation, African American literature is a dying form
  • YouTube clip of visual artist Faith Ringgold “Political Art
  • Excerpt from Black Theater: the Making of a Movement with James Earl Jones, Amiri Baraka, Dr. Barbara Ann Teer. Available in the Lehman College Library or streaming on Kanopy. (You’ll need to sign in with your Lehman, NYPL, or Brooklyn Public Library credentials to view.)