Week 5: Africans in America Part 1

Image: Building More Stately Mansions. By Jacob Lawrence. 1944. Oil on Canvas, Fisk University Libraries, Nashville TN.

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Get a copy of the two required course book if you haven’t done so already. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester.  The bookstore claims to now have rental copies in stock: check with them.
  • There’s a class WhatsApp group that is helpful–or so I’m told since I’m not on it. Anyhow, check it out if you haven’t yet.
  • I’ll be post a PDF file of chapter 4 on the Readings page for those still waiting for the book: look for it Saturday

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • The sessions are being recorded. Audio on the  Zoom lectures page. Still figuring out the best way to post them. Stay tuned.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

Quick highlights from fourth class on 2/24

  • Website review
  • Zoom wait room music: Gary Bartz and Ntu Troop’s “I’ve Known Rivers
  • Musical selection: Randy Weston’s “African Cookbook.”
  • Reviewed Chapter 3 from Introduction to Black Studies
  • See the Lecture Notes page for a PDF of the slide deck presented in class
  • UPDATE: Zoom audio now posted on the Zoom lectures page. (Same password as everything else on the site.)

What to do for Week 5–March 3:

  • Read: the first half of Chapter 4 (Africans in America) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (Sections 4.1-4.9 only; pages 105-147: PDF on the Readings page on Saturday poseted!).
    • Pay special attention to the subsections on The Holocaust of Enslavement, System of Enslavement, Reconstruction, Booker T. Washington, WEB DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Ida B. Wells
    • Pay special attention to Critical Thinking questions 1 and 3 on p. 185, especially the comparisons between the people named above
    • More focused questions TBA
  •  Read “African American Historians and the Reclaiming of African History” by Dr. John Henrik Clarke (PDF on the Readings page)

RESPOND to one idea in the chapter and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday March 3

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • How do Drs. Clarke and Karenga think we should approach history?
  • How does the defeat of Reconstruction shape the lives of Black people in the US?
  • What forms of resistance do Black people in the US enngage in?
  • What organizations do Black people form for advancement and resistance?
  • What differences and similarities do you see between DuBois, Washington, Garvey, and Wells-Barnett?

What’s Next?

Chapter 4, second half in Introduction to Black Studies: “Black History: Africans in America”

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 4: Black History/ African Background

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Get a copy of the two required course book if you haven’t done so already. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester.  If ordering online, you should order it now so it’ll arrive in time. Details on the books page. I’m aware of the issues with the bookstore and am looking into the situation.
  • Please sign up for the class text message service run by Remind(.com) if you haven’t done so yet
    • You can sign up online here or send a text message to (608) 467-4328 and type the following as the message: @aas166.
    • Makes it easy for me to quickly send out important messages
  • There’s a class WhatsApp group that is helpful–or so I’m told since I’m not on it. Anyhow, check it out if you haven’t yet.

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • The sessions are being recorded. Still figuring out the best way to post them. Stay tuned.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

General Announcements:

  • Lehman has emergency grants available to quickly provide money for housing, medical, food, transportation, and other needs. Details at the Student Affairs office.
  • The Lehman Food Bank offers food assistance. Details here.
  • Lehman has a very comprehensive page of students resources including laptop/tablet loans. Details here.

Events

  • Shameless self-promotion, but I’m moderating a Zoom discussion on Monday 2/22 from 7-9 PM with several members of The Last Poets: an important group of poets/activists with roots in the Black Power/Black Arts era of the 1960s-70s and still performing and writing today. It’s free: sign-up here.
  • After my event, you might want to watch the Mr. SOUL! documentary film on PBS @ 10 PM and streaming after that.

Quick highlights from third class on 2/17

  • Website review
  • Zoom wait room music: Betty Carter’s “Feed the Fire
  • Musical selection: Albert Collins’s “Snowed In.”
  • Reviewed Chapters 1 and 2 from Introduction to Black Studies
  • See the Lecture Notes page for a PDF of the slide deck presented in class (UPDATE: posted!)
  • See the video of Temple University’s Molefe Asante defining Afrocentricity on YouTube

What to do for Week 4–February 24:

READ Chapter 3 (“Black History: African Background”) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 65-102).

  • As usual, start with the Key Terms and Study Questions at the end of the chapter to guide your reading.
  • Focus on the following: the concepts of Maat, sankofa, and Sebait.
  • And the following people: Imhotep and Ptah-hotep.
  • Read the sections “The Legacy of Egypt” and “The Decline of African Societies” slowly and carefully and take good notes.
  • Connect points in this chapter to the points in section 2.6 (“Classical African Studies”) to the sections from Chapter 2 and Dr. Karenga’s reasons for the importance of Egypt and Nile Valley civilization on pp. 56-57
  • Focus on Critical Thinking questions 2,3 and 5. You don’t have to write out extensive answers, but take brief notes on each. 

RESPOND to one idea in the chapter and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday February 24

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • TBA

What’s Next?

Chapter 4 in Introduction to Black Studies: “Black History: Africans in America”

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 3: Black Studies definitions, founding, and structure

Image: the sankofa bird, an Adinkra symbol translating into “return and fetch it”, meaning reaching back to the past for wisdom needed to go forward into the future.

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Get a copy of the two required course book if you haven’t done so already. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester.  If ordering online, you should order it now so it’ll arrive in time. Details on the books page. I’m aware of the issues with the bookstore and am looking into the situation.
  • Sato has generously volunteered to provide copies of this week’s reading for anyone who doesn’t have the book yet: see the class WhatsApp group for details
  • Please sign up for the class text message service run by Remind(.com) if you haven’t done so yet
    • You can sign up online here or send a text message to (608) 467-4328 and type the following as the message: @aas166.
    • Makes it easy for me to quickly send out important messages–like today when I was way too sick to run my classes

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • The sessions will be recorded starting from now on: still figuring out the best way to post them. Stay tuned.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

General Announcements:

  • Lehman has emergency grants available to quickly provide money for housing, medical, food, transportation, and other needs. Details at the Student Affairs office.
  • The Lehman Food Bank offers food assistance. Details here.
  • Lehman has a very comprehensive page of students resources including laptop/tablet loans. Details here.

Quick highlights from second class on 2/10

  • Website review
  • Zoom wait room music: Herbie Hancock’s “Maiden Voyage
  • Musical selection: Kamasi Washington’s “Change of the Guard.”
  • Re-reading of Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (handout and also on the Readings page). What’s his view of a Black Studies methodology (i.e. ways to analyze information and do research) and how should it approach the world?
  • Reviewed key points of the Dr. John Henrik Clarke documentary A Great and Mighty Walk. It’s on YouTube if you want a refresher. (Consider sharing the link with your own intro to it on social media. Think about watching it with family members, your church group, tenants’ association, PTA chapter, etc.)

What to do for Week 3–February 17:

READ Chapters 1 and 2 in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 1-60).

  • Skim (read quickly and to gain an overview) pp 1-17 on history and development of the discipline.
  • Focus (read carefully and closely) on the following sections: (pp 17-27) 1.3 (Relevance of the Discipline) and 1.4 (Scope of the Discipline) and sections 2.3-2.7 — the different developmental initiatives.
  • Read only pp 39-60 (“Developmental Initiatives”) in chapter 2
  • This book is on reserve at Lehman’s library if yours doesn’t arrive in time.
  • Pay special attention to section 2.6 (“Classical African Studies”). Focus on pp. 54-57, particularly the section on Cheikh Anta Diop.
    • Know why Diop is a significant figure and his intellectual contributions.
    • Also be able to explain Karenga’s reasons for the importance of Egypt and Nile Valley civilization on pp. 56-57

RESPOND to the questions at the bottom of this post and DISCUSS them with classmates and myself

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday February 17

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • What is worldview?
  • What’s the importance of worldview to the discipline of Africana Studies?
  • How does the origin of the discipline shape the approach?
  • How does the issue of relevance shape the discipline?
  • Why is Cheikh Anta Diop important to Africana Studies?

What’s Next?

Chapter 3 in Introduction to Black Studies: “Black History: African Background”

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

 

Spring 21 Week 2: Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s Great and Mighty Walk

Hi everyone,

Expect a new post here every week with full details on what to do. Posts will usually go live on Thursdays.

First a few housekeeping things before we get to the assignment itself. There’s a lot in this week’s post but there’s a lot to cover. It will be shorter after the first few weeks.

  • You might find it helpful to subscribe to new posts for this site: use the e-mail sign-up form on the main page.
  • If you’re new to the class, welcome! Be sure to carefully review class policies on the syllabus.
  • Get copies of the required course book: Dr. Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies, 4th edition.. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester. You can also buy the book directly from the publisher at the list price. See links on the books page.

Please sign up for the class text message service run by Remind(.com) if you haven’t done so yet

  • You can sign up online here or send a text message to (608) 467-4328 and type the following as the message: @aas166.
  • Makes it easy for me to quickly send out important messages–like today when I was way too sick to run my classes

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • The sessions will be recorded starting next week: still figuring out the best way to post them. Stay tuned.
  • Sign-up info for both Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

General Announcements:

  • Lehman has emergency grants available to quickly provide money for housing, medical, food, transportation, and other needs. Details at the Student Affairs office.
  • The Lehman Food Bank offers food assistance. Details here.
  • Lehman has a very comprehensive page of students resources including laptop/tablet loans. Details here.

Audio tour of this website

If you missed the first class session, this short tour of the site and the syllabus should get you up to speed. Also see the FAQ page for more info. This lecture is optional: if you were in the Zoom session or can grasp the website, you can skip it.

[coming this weekend.]

Quick highlights from first class on 2/3:

  • Course Intro & syllabus overview
  • Zoom wait room music: Archie Shepp’s “New Africa
  • Musical selection: Dizzy Gillespie’s “Swing Low, Sweet Cadillac.”
  • Reading of Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (handout and also on the Readings page). What’s his view of a Black Studies methodology (i.e. ways to analyze information and do research) and how should it approach the world?
  • Screened first ~25 minutes of the Dr. John Henrik Clarke documentary A Great and Mighty Walk. It’s on YouTube if you want a refresher. (Consider sharing the link with your own intro to it on social media. Think about watching it with family members, your church group, tenants’ association, PTA chapter, etc.)

What to do for Week 2–February 8:

RE-READ Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (on the Readings page. Password hint: what year is it?).

WATCH the 90-minute documentary embedded below of the late scholar Dr. John Henrik Clarke

RESPOND to the questions at the bottom of this post and DISCUSS them with classmates and myself

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday February 10

Things to think about while viewing and for discussion:

  • What is Dr. Clarke’s view of history and how should we relate to it?
  • Why study ancient African civilizations, especially Kemet and Nile Valley civilization, according to Dr. Clarke?
  • How, according to Dr. Clarke, has the history of Kemet’s contributions to Greek civilization been erased?
  • Consider sharing the link on your social media feed and watching it with friends, family, children or hosting a watch party for your PTA, church group, tenants’ association, etc.

Note: the video takes a sweeping view of history and Dr. Clarke includes an astounding amount of information. Don’t try to take down everything: focus on some key points or maybe a few figures to look at in more detail later. The goal is to gain a broad grasp of a key foundational figure in Africana Studies and think about his approach to history.

Highlight or underline key points in Dr. J’s essay. Write down notes as you read and watch the documentary. Write down questions of things you don’t understand for us to answer in class.

What’s Next?

We’ll review highlights of the Dr. Clarke documentary, discuss Africana Studies methodology, and revisit Dr. J’s essay.

Comments on posts:

You’ll notice the “Let’s Talk” button is below. Here’s how it’ll work: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Important AAS 166 Spring ’21 Semester Start Info

Welcome to the Spring 2021 Semester!

If you’re registered for section A81 of AAS 166: Intro to Africana Studies with Prof. Williams, then you’re in the right place!

This post will be mostly informational: the specific info for next week’s assignment will be in a separate follow-up, which you’ll see above this post when it’s published. Every week will have one of these posts with specific instructions and a discussion board–more on that below.

Note that this website is the official home for the course this semester! Info and updates will be here, not on Blackboard!

First class Zoom meeting:

First: check the announcement on Blackboard for the link to register for the weekly Zoom lecture on Wednesdays at 6 PM EST. Please use your real name (or an obvious nickname) when registering so I know exactly who’s in the “room.”

email me if you can’t find it or didn’t get the announcement. Please email me before 6 PM on Wednesday: it’s difficult enough just running Zoom. Responding to messages while on Zoom usually doesn’t work well.

Zoom runs more smoothly for me with their app for your computer, phone, or tablet which you can download here or in the iOS or Google Play store. You should also be able to join by phone (audio) only, though I’ll be sharing some slides, so video will be better but you can follow up later.

Class text message service

I’ve also set up a text message service for the semester hosted by Remind. Please sign up for that right now: it will allow me to quickly send notes to everyone. (You can get the messages by email if you don’t have a cell phone that allows text messages.)

Course book

Please see the course books page, which has info on our required textbook: Dr. Maulana Karenga’s  Introduction to Black Studies, 4th edition. It’s often listed online at inflated prices. Try the college bookstore first or go directly to the publisher for it.

You should order the book immediately because books often take a long time to ship!

First class agenda

The agenda for our first meet on Wednesday February 3, 2021 will be course logistics (including a tour of the website), a short icebreaker or two, and an intro to next week’s assignment.

See you then!

Comments on posts

One key method we’ll use throughout the semester is a discussion board on each weekly post. You should see a “Leave a Comment” button all the way at the bottom of this post. Click on that and fill in your name and email (both required since I moderate comments, but your email’s not publicly visible) and then add your comment. As a test, you can start by saying hello on this post.

Finally, if you’re in NYC, then here’s our weather forecast this week:

December 18: Final exam!

Announcements:

  • The final exam is on December 18 from 6-8 PM in our usual classroom. DO NOT MISS IT. THERE WILL NOT BE A MAKE-UP!
  • If anyone’s interested, I also teach a Contemporary Urban Writers course in the English Department, which is English 229. It focuses on Black, Puerto Rican, and Dominican New York City-based writers from the 1960s to the present. It’s Writing Intensive and meets the Creative Expression distribution requirement. There are 2 sections, meeting either on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons or evenings. More details here.

Kwanzaa Events:

  • Sister’s Uptown Bookstore (1942 Amsterdam Ave near 156 St in Manhattan) is having several Kwanzaa events. There’s a screening of the documentary film The Black Candle on Friday December 20 and an actual Kwanzaa celebration on Saturday December 28 from 1-5 PM. Details on both events on their Facebook page. The Kwanzaa event on the 28th will have elements specifically geared for children.
  • CEMOTAP  (Committee to Eliminate Media Offensive to African People) is having a pre-Kwanzaa event in South Ozone Park Queens near JFK Airport on Saturday December 20 starting at 2 PM. Details at the Facebook event page.
  • Parkchester’s annual Kwanzaa celebration in The Bronx is on Saturday December 28 from 4-8 PM at St. Helena Church, 1315 Olmstead Ave in The Bronx. There is a small suggested donation. Details here
  • the Kwanzaa Celebration in Brooklyn mentioned by Dr. Segun Shabaka in class will be on Sunday December 29 from 4-8 PM at IS 258, 141 Macon St, Brooklyn NY. It is intentionally a family friendly program. You should plan on bringing children and there will be music, an exciting African dance presentation, and vendors selling clothing, books, and other goods in addition to a talk by Dr. Maulana Karenga (the author of our textbook). There’s a small admission fee (that you can negotiate if you’re truly broke). Details (soon) at their website.

Final exam overview

  • Format will be two written blue book essays on the themes listed below. You will have a choice of essays
  • Written notes and books will not be allowed

Areas to focus on for exam

  • Africana Studies approaches to religion, psychology, social sciences, politics
  • 3 Major Modal Periods in Africana history
  • Harold Cruse’s paradigm for social organization of economics, politics, and culture
  • Role of culture and/or religion
  • Different approaches to Pan Africanism
  • Garvey, DuBois, Washington, Clarke and role of Education
  • Cheikh Anta Diop’s importance/contributions to field of Africana Studies (from IBS)

Quick highlights from 12/12 class:

  • Reviewed  “Can African People Save Themselves?” in Dr. Clarke’s Notes for An African World Revolution (pp. 383-420)
  • Exam overview
  • Notes for approaching essay exams: mine and others. See my handout on essay exams: coming soon

 

Week of December 11: Final class and review

https://i2.wp.com/www.geekandspell.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2_THE_EAST_BLACKWDS_WEB.jpg

Image: Detail from X Clan To the East, Blackwards

Announcements:

  • Our last class is next week (12/11)
  • The final exam is on December 18 from 6-8 PM in our usual classroom
  • SAVE THE DATE: the Kwanzaa Celebration in Brooklyn mentioned by Dr. Segun Shabaka in class will be on Sunday December 29 from 4-7 PM at IS 258, 141 Macon St, Brooklyn NY. It is intentionally a family friendly program. You should plan on bringing children and there will be music and an exciting African dance presentation in addition to a talk by Dr. Maulana Karenga (the author of our Introduction to Black Studies textbook). There’s a small admission fee (that you can negotiate if you’re truly broke). Details coming soon at the Int’l African Arts Fest website.

On Wednesday December 11, we’ll have our final class meeting. Please bring Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies textbook with you also, since the second half of the class will be a review for the final exam.

Read the following:

  •  “Can African People Save Themselves?” in Dr. Clarke’s Notes for An African World Revolution (pp. 383-420).
  • The Introduction of Chapter 11 in Introduction to Black Studies on Critical Thinking (pp. 425-429) and “An Ethics of Sharing” (pp. 474-479)

What to read/look for:

  • What challenges does Dr. Clarke pose for the future of African people globally?
  • What are the key points Dr. Karenga suggests are part of the critical thinking process?

Quick highlights from 12/5 class:

  • Thanks to Dr. Segun Shabaka for his guest lecture! See more info on the US Organization at their website. Info on his trips/tours is available at the Pyramid Productions website and info on the annual International African Arts Festival is at their website.

Weeks of November 28/December 4: Off week/ Kawaida with Dr. Segun Shabaka

Photo: Dr. Segun Shabaka. Credit: Joyce Jones/SugaBowl Photography

Announcement:

Wednesday 11/27 we will not meet because of the holiday the next day. CUNY has not cancelled classes though so check any other classes you may have scheduled.

On Wednesday 12/4, we’ll have a guest speaker, Dr. Segun Shabaka, who will do a presentation on the background of the Kawaida philosophy developed by Dr. Maulana Karenga and the US Organization and Kwanzaa. Dr. Shabaka is currently co-chair of the New York chapter of NAKO: the National Association of Kawaida Organizations and formerly a member of the Brooklyn-based cultural center The East, which was a strong presence in the 1970-mid 80s and were the founders of the still-running International African Arts Festival, held annually in Brooklyn over the Fourth of July weekend.

Guests are welcome! Invite classmates, family members, boy/girlfriends, or whoever you think needs to be here!

To prepare for his talk and our class session:

  • (Re)read the sections on Kawaida Theory in Introduction to Black Studies (pages 160-162, 260-263, 420-421)
  • Watch the following presentation on Kwanzaa via YouTube (It’s 48 minutes long)
  • Write 2-3 questions for Dr. Shabaka based on Dr. Karenga’s talk below.

 

Quick Highlights from 11/20 class:

  • Reviewed Chapter 10 on Black Psychology  in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 265-283).
    • Focused on sections
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • Musical interlude: Ice-T “Mind Over Matter” from O.G. (1991). Watch on YouTube

 

Week of November 20: Black Psychology and Quiz #2

Photo: Dr. Wade Nobles

For Wednesday 11/20, read chapter 10 (Black Psychology) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. Read the entire chapter (pp. 397-422), but pay special attention to the following sections:

  • Intro and historical origins (10.1, 10.2)
  • 3 major schools: differences between approaches (10.3)
  • Radical School (10.4)
  • Ethos (10.5)
  • See the six study questions at the end of the chapter to further focus your reading

Our second (and last) quiz will be next Wednesday (11/20) in the first 20 minutes of class.

Quiz topics:

  • Section 6.2 (Ghettoization: know key points that define the ghetto)
  • Section 6.4 (Culture: know the Deficiency and Crusian Paradigms)
  • Section 6.5 (Black family: know the Pathological/Pathogenic School)
  • Section 6.7 (Quality Relations and The Connections)
  • Sections 7.2  (Politics in U.S. context)
  • Section 7.6 (Black elected officials: know Limitations/Constraints and Functions)
  • Section 7.8 (Misconceptions of coalitions)

Highlights from last class:

  • Reviewed Chapter 7 on Black Politics  in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 265-283).
    • Focused on sections 7.2, 7.6, 7.7
  • Did not get to Dr. Clarke essays
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • Musical interlude: The Chi-Lites “Give More Power to the People.” Live TV performance on Soul Train. Watch on YouTube

Announcements

  • Schedule change: Class meets on Wednesday November 20 and doesn’t meet on Wed November 27 (the night before Thanksgiving).
  • Our next quiz is moved to 11/20 (not 11/13, as on the syllabus)
  • If you earned less than a B on the midterm, email me for an optional makeup assignment. I’ll email instructions back to you. This option is only for those who earned a C or below! You don’t need to email me again if you signed the contact sheet after the last class.

Week of November 13: Black Politics

https://scontent-ort2-2.cdninstagram.com/v/t51.2885-15/sh0.08/e35/s750x750/67318151_385345788784827_1163511793972071785_n.jpg?_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.cdninstagram.com&oh=f006c66a2055785f35385ac3d1bfdaf9&oe=5E0AC647&ig_cache_key=MjA4OTY0Njk5NjcyMzI5NjI5Mw%3D%3D.2

Photo: It’s Nation Time. Amiri Baraka. Black Forum Records (Motown). 1972.

For Wednesday 11/13, read chapter 7 (Black Politics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies.

Also read “Kwame Nkrumah, The Political Rehearsal: His American Years” (101-113) in Dr. Clarke’s Notes for an African World Revolution. Also read “On Leadership” (pp.33-34) and “On Alliances” (pp. 39-40). Obviously this means you must bring both books with you.

What to read for/concentrate on: TBA–will post this weekend

Highlights from last class:

  • Reviewed the parts of Chapter 6 on Africana Womanism  in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 265-283).
  • Did not get to Clenora Hudson-Weems’s “Africana Womanism: an Overview” (PDF on the Readings page)
  • Musical intro: Nana Camille Yarbrough’s “Hand Me Down Love” Listen on YouTube
  • Musical interlude: Queen Latifah “U.N.I.T.Y.” Listen on YouTube

Announcements

  • Schedule change: Class meets on Wednesday November 20 and doesn’t meet on Wed November 27 (the night before Thanksgiving).
  • Our next quiz is moved to 11/20 (not 11/13, as on the syllabus)