Guest Speakers

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Photo: Fannie Lou Hamer  of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in 1965. Embedded with permission from Getty Images.

Spring 2021 Guest Speakers

Dr. Karanja Keita Carroll on Africana Psychology

Karanja Keita Carroll, Ph.D. is currently an independent scholar and Lecturer of Africana Studies at Baruch College (CUNY). From 2006- 2015 he taught at the State University of New York (SUNY) at New Paltz in the Department of Black Studies, as an Associate Professor of Africana/Black Studies. Since 2000 Dr. Carroll has provided a variety of education, pedagogy and social justice workshops throughout New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. He has also taught inside a variety of correctional institutions including: SCI-Chester, SCI-Graterford, Brookwood Juvenile Facility, Shawangunk Correctional Facility, Wallkill Correctional Facility and Sullivan Correctional Facility. His teaching and research interests revolve around African- centered theory & methodology, with an emphasis on social and psychological theory. His publications have appeared in Africology: The Journal of Pan African Studies, Western Journal of Black Studies, Journal of the International Society of Teacher Education, Critical Sociology, Race, Gender & Class and numerous edited volumes. He is also Associate Editor of the Africology: The Journal of Pan African Studies. Dr. Carroll is an African-centered social theorist who is thoroughly committed to the African-centered imperative, one that is grounded in the creation and utilization of culturally-specific frameworks in order to understand and create solutions for humanity. Dr. Carroll is committed to “academic excellence and social responsibility” as originally articulated by the National Council for Black Studies.

Date TBD

Other speakers to be added

Fall 2019 Guest Speakers

All are in the usual classroom in Carman Hall (Room 332) at Lehman College during the normal class time from 6-8:40 PM on Wednesdays. See the home page for reading assignments and talk descriptions a week before the scheduled appearance. Guests from both inside and outside the Lehman community are welcome to attend. See a campus map or directions to Carman and Lehman. Feel free to contact the instructor for more information.

December 4: Dr. Segun Shabaka on Kawaida Philosophy and Kwanzaa.

Dr. Shabaka is currently co-chair of the New York chapter of NAKO: the National Association of Kawaida Organizations and formerly a member of the Brooklyn-based cultural center The East, which was a strong presence in the 1970-mid 80s and were the founders of the still-running International African Arts Festival, held annually in Brooklyn over the Fourth of July weekend.

October 23: Tyrone Birkett on “How Can We Sing in a Strange Land: Jazz Freedom Songs” (approx. 7:30 PM Start time)

Tyrone Birkett is a saxophonist, composer, producer, and speaker with extensive experience partnering art and social consciousness as an “artist for humanity”. Focused on creating music that affirms the good and the beautiful, in spite of what we see in our world. As the conceptualist, composer and musical director of the band Tyrone Birkett | Emancipation, he has created Postmodern Spirituals, a project that synthesizes jazz language, black church music, soul music & Negro spirituals. Fronted by his saxophone and the declarative vocals of his wife, Paula Ralph Birkett, lyric and melody are enveloped in a sonic environment of intriguing harmonies, funk and jazz rhythmic underpinnings, shaped by painstakingly constructed arrangements, topped off with virtuosic & soulful improvisation.

“I want the music to be a catharsis for expressing freedom of heart, mind, and soul. A ‘lifting’ of the atmosphere at least for a little while”, Tyrone remarks. To that purpose, he assembles a core set of musicians with experience in jazz, r&b and black church music. Musicians that have played with diverse acts such as gospel superstars Mary Mary, jazz trendsetter Jason Moran, r&b mainstays Faith Evans and Kelly Price and a cappella African-American music legends Sweet Honey In The Rocks to name a few. This merger of Jazz sensibilities, with Soul and Spirit music with his own conception brings a multi-dimensional experience to the listener.

For twenty-five years Tyrone has been comfortable in bringing curative and empowering art to concert stages and clubs as well as prisons, hospitals, and schools, what keeps him going? “The joy of abstract creative ideas which then become sonic realities on stage, and the imagining of people feeling free and revived. It is a quest you want to take on over and over again. I want people to be free.”

 

PREVIOUS CLASS GUESTS

Fall 2018 Guest Speakers

November 14: Dr. Karanja Keita Carroll on Africana Psychology

Karanja Keita Carroll, Ph.D. is currently an independent scholar and adjunct professor of Africana Studies at Baruch College (CUNY) and the County College of Morris in New Jersey. From 2006- 2015 he taught at the State University of New York (SUNY) at New Paltz in the Department of Black Studies, as an Associate Professor of Africana/Black Studies. Since 2000 Dr. Carroll has provided a variety of education, pedagogy and social justice workshops throughout New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. He has also taught inside a variety of correctional institutions including: SCI-Chester, SCI-Graterford, Brookwood Juvenile Facility, Shawangunk Correctional Facility, Wallkill Correctional Facility and Sullivan Correctional Facility. His teaching and research interests revolve around African- centered theory & methodology, with an emphasis on social and psychological theory. His publications have appeared in Africology: The Journal of Pan African Studies, Western Journal of Black Studies, Journal of the International Society of Teacher Education, Critical Sociology, Race, Gender & Class and numerous edited volumes. He is also Associate Editor of the Africology: The Journal of Pan African Studies. Dr. Carroll is an African-centered social theorist who is thoroughly committed to the African-centered imperative, one that is grounded in the creation and utilization of culturally-specific frameworks in order to understand and create solutions for humanity. Dr. Carroll is committed to “academic excellence and social responsibility” as originally articulated by the National Council for Black Studies.

Background reading: Carroll, Karanja Keita. “A genealogical analysis of the worldview framework in African-centered psychology.” The Journal of Pan African Studies 3, no. 8 (2010): 109-134. PDF online here.

November 28: Dr. Segun Shabaka on Kwanzaa and Kawaida Theory

Dr. Shabaka is co-chair of National Association of Kawaida Organizations (NAKO) in Brooklyn.

Fall 2017 Guest Speakers

October 25: Dr. Karanja Keita Carroll on Black Psychology

Karanja Keita Carroll, Ph.D. is currently an independent scholar and adjunct professor of Africana Studies at Seton Hall University, Hunter College (CUNY) and Baruch College (CUNY). From 2006- 2015 he taught at the State University of New York (SUNY) at New Paltz in the Department of Black Studies, as an Associate Professor of Africana/Black Studies. Since 2000 Dr. Carroll has provided a variety of education, pedagogy and social justice workshops throughout New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. He has also taught inside a variety of correctional institutions including: SCI-Chester, SCI-Graterford, Brookwood Juvenile Facility, Shawangunk Correctional Facility, Wallkill Correctional Facility and Sullivan Correctional Facility. His teaching and research interests revolve around African- centered theory & methodology, with an emphasis on social and psychological theory. His publications have appeared in Africology: The Journal of Pan African Studies, Western Journal of Black Studies, Journal of the International Society of Teacher Education, Critical Sociology, Race, Gender & Class and numerous edited volumes. He is also Associate Editor of the Africology: The Journal of Pan African Studies. Dr. Carroll is an African-centered social theorist who is thoroughly committed to the African-centered imperative, one that is grounded in the creation and utilization of culturally-specific frameworks in order to understand and create solutions for humanity. Dr. Carroll is committed to “academic excellence and social responsibility” as originally articulated by the National Council for Black Studies.

 

November 29: Basir Mchawi on Kwanzaa’s Legacy at The East

Basir Mchawi is a longtime host of “Education at the Crossroads” that airs Thursday nights on WBAI Radio and is retired from a long career as an educator in New York City public schools, independent Black schools, and teaching on the college level in CUNY. As a member of The East, Mchawi served as editor and publisher of their monthly newspaper Black News and  producer/host of  View From The East, a public affairs show that aired on New York’s WLIB Radio.