Spring 23 NIGHT SECTION Feb 7: Africana Studies Foundations

Hi everyone,

Expect a new post here every week with full details on what to do. Posts will usually go live on Thursdays.

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE NIGHT SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

First a few housekeeping things before we get to the assignment itself. There’s a lot in this week’s post but there’s a lot to cover. It will be shorter after the first few weeks.

  • You might find it helpful to subscribe to new posts for this site: use the e-mail sign-up form on the main page.
  • If you’re new to the class, welcome! Be sure to carefully review class policies on the syllabus.
  • Get the required course book: Dr. Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies, 4th edition.. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester. You can also buy the book directly from the publisher at the list price. See links on the books page.

Please sign up for the class text message service run by Remind(.com) if you haven’t done so yet

  • You can sign up online here or send a text message to 81010 and type the following as the message: @aas166nite.

General Announcements:

  • Lehman has emergency grants available to quickly provide money for housing, medical, food, transportation, and other needs. Details at the Student Affairs office.
  • The Lehman Food Bank offers food assistance. Details here.
  • Lehman has a very comprehensive page of students resources including laptop/tablet loans. Details here.
  • NY State has reinstated TAP financial aid eligibility for part time students! Details here

Quick highlights from week 1: Tuesday January 31

  • REVIEWED Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (handout and also on the Readings page). What’s his view of a Black Studies methodology (i.e. ways to analyze information and do research) and how should it approach the world?

DO THIS for Tuesday February 7:

There are 3 short PDF readings (total about 28 pages) and one video (20 minutes) for next week.

WATCH Prof. Jeffrey Kaplan’s video on how to read texts to remember and understand information on YouTube. (23 minutes)

(RE)READ Dr. Leonard Jeffries’s essay The Essence of Black Studies.” (PDF on the Readings page if you lost/don’t have it)

READ Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s essay “Africana Studies: A Decade of Change, Challenge, and Conflict” (13 page PDF file on the Readings page)

READ pages 1-16 from chapter 1 in the Introduction to Black Studies textbook (13 page PDF file on the Readings page–POSTED ON WEDNESDAY)

Things to think about while viewing and for discussion

Watch Dr. Kaplan’s video for tips on the process of reading and taking notes. List the key strategies he suggests in your notebook and try them for the readings this week.

Dr. Clarke’s essay was presented at a conference of the African Heritage Studies Association. In this essay, he makes an attempt to trace some of the early history of the discipline (academic major) of Africana Studies and present some of the key issues he thinks it faces.

Dr. Karenga in the textbook chapter places the emergence of Black Studies/Africana Studies within the historical framework of the 1960s movements.

Try to understand the following key points from the essay:

  • What is the issue with naming the major–specifically Black Studies vs Africana Studies?
  • What is the dilemma that Black scholars/writers face?
  • What is the significance of the contributions of W.E.B. Du Bois and Carter G. Woodson?
  • What’s the importance of the search for ideology Dr. Clarke mentions in the last few pages?
  • How does the political climate of the 1960s shape the beginning of Black Studies as an academic discipline?

BRING a copies of Dr. Clarke’s essay and the selected pages from the textbook to class with you.

What’s Next?

We start reading from the Introduction to Black Studies textbook. We’ll start with chapter 1.

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AAS 166 Spring ’23 Semester Start Info and Day section assignment [Updated!]

Welcome to the Spring 2023 Semester!

If you’re registered for Lehman’s AAS 166: Intro to Africana Studies with Prof. Williams in section XT81 meeting Tuesday nights from 6-8:40 PM OR section J301 meeting Monday/Wednesday from 1:30-2:45, then you’re in the right place!

Note that both class sections meet in person on campus! You must be able to attend all scheduled classes on campus. You should switch to another section now if you anticipate having problems being present for all class meetings.

  • Section J301 from 1:30-2:45 PM Mon/Wed meets in Carman Hall 331
  • Section XT81 from 6-8:40 PM Tuesday meets in Carman Hall 331

This post will be mostly informational: the specific info for next week’s assignment will be in a separate follow-up post, which you’ll see above this post when it’s published. Every week will have a new post for each class section with specific instructions for your class.

Immediate tasks:

  • Buy or rent the textbook. Details on the books page (Note that the bookstore’s listing for the
  • Sign up for the text announcement list for your section (scroll down to find it)
  • Attend the first classes–double check the time and Carman Hall room #. Remember that all classes meet in person on campus this semester!

Note that this website is the official home for the course this semester! Info and updates will be here, not on Blackboard!

Course book

Please see the course books page, which has info on our required textbook: Dr. Maulana Karenga’s  Introduction to Black Studies, 4th edition. It’s often listed online at inflated prices. Try the college bookstore first or go directly to the publisher for it.

You should buy or order the book immediately because books often take a long time to ship! We will use it every week and you cannot successfully pass the course without it or without doing the reading!

Syllabus

Will be distributed in class and posted on the syllabus page after the first class meeting. There is a different syllabus for each class section

Class text message service

I’ve also set up a text message service for the semester hosted by Remind. Please sign up right now: it lets me to quickly send important notes to everyone. (You can get the messages by email if you don’t have a cell phone that allows text messages.)

  • Sign up for day section (1F) here
  • Sign up for night section (XT81) here

Day section week 2 assignments: DO THIS FOR NEXT WEEK

Monday January 30

READ the essay by Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr. “The Essence of Black Studies” located on the Readings Page. PRINT IT OUT AND BRING A COPY WITH YOU TO CLASS ON MONDAY!

Pay attention to the following: Highlight or underline key points in Dr. J’s essay. What is Black Studies, according to Dr. J? What isn’t Black Studies according to Dr. J? What should it be doing?

WATCH Prof. Jeffrey Kaplan’s video on how to read texts to remember and understand information on YouTube. (23 minutes)

Wednesday February 1

(RE)-READ and Watch Dr. J’s essay and Prof. Kaplan’s video since we didn’t finish. Look for the questions posed above for Dr. J’s essay.

For Prof. Kaplan’s video, list key points he makes about reading. Apply his suggestions to Dr. Jeffries’s essay!

Mood

Be glad it’s (as of now) just rain–not snow–this last week of January, Missy Elliott’s aversion to it notwithstanding. Missy’s debut is a classic part of the hip hop cannon thanks to her buttery-smooth flow and Timbaland’s lean production. Meanwhile, director Hype Williams’s stylized video keeps things simple, with the whimsical costumes and minimal storyline. The simple, infectious repeated lyrics help make this a perennial favorite. Maybe it’ll become a staple of your playlists, too.

DAY section week 16: Final class and review

 

 

https://i0.wp.com/www.geekandspell.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2_THE_EAST_BLACKWDS_WEB.jpg

Image: Detail from X Clan To the East, Blackwards

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE DAY SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE NIGHT SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • STUDY BREAK: NY African Diaspora International Film Festival ends on 12/11. Details at their site

Course Announcements:

  • DAY SECTION Final exam is WEDNESDAY December 21 from 1-3 PM in usual classroom–in person on campus only. Don’t miss it
  • Our last class meeting is Monday 12/12
  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Mondays 12/12 from 4-5 PM on Zoom here or on campus in Carman 291. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. email for an appointment to meet Wednesday 12/14
  • Spring 2023 Course: For those interested, I’ll be teaching African American History (AAS 245) meeting Monday nights on campus.

Quick highlights from Week 15 (12/5)’s class:

  • Reviewed the second half of Chapter 8 on Black Economics in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • Resource: National Urban League’s State of Black America report

DO THIS for week 16–Monday December 12

FINISH/REVIEW chapter 8 (Economics) 

This class will be a structured review/open Q&A for the final. My prepared presentation will cover the format of our exam itself and a general approach to essay exams. We’ll answer any open questions and collectively brainstorm some approaches. Please bring Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies textbook with you also, since the second half of the class will be a review for the final exam.

Read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF), which will help you begin to prepare for our final (and hopefully others as well). It summarizes much of what is usually in my prep sessions.

DAY SECTION Final Exam Info:

Wednesday December 21 from 1-3 PM in usual classroom–in person on campus only.

Format: 2 different essays on chapters from second half of semester only. More details forthcoming next week.

Scope: Will cover assigned sections from chapters 6 (Sociology), 7 (Politics), 8 (Economics) only.

Remember the materials to help you review on this website:

  • Scroll through the weekly Course Updates posts for a quick overview of the entire semester’s work (and reading questions)
  • My own Lecture Notes

 

NIGHT section week 16: Final class and review

 

https://i0.wp.com/www.geekandspell.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2_THE_EAST_BLACKWDS_WEB.jpg

Image: Detail from X Clan To the East, Blackwards

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE NIGHT SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site

Course Announcements:

  • NIGHT SECTION Final exam is Monday December 19 from 6:15-8:15 PM in usual classroom–in person on campus only. Don’t miss it
  • Our last class meeting is next Monday (12/12)
  • Midterms have been returned to your email address.
  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Mondays/Wednesdays from 4-5 PM on Zoom here or on campus in Carman 291. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. [NO OFFICE HOURS THIS WEDNESDAY. (Even I have to take a break once in a while …)]
  • Spring 2023 Course: For those interested, I’ll be teaching African American History (AAS 245) meeting Monday night on campus.

Quick highlights from Week 15 (12/5)’s class:

  • Reviewed the second half of Chapter 10 on Black Psychology in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • In-class video: Dr. Wade Nobles’s “A Brief History of ABPSi” on YouTube
  • In-class video: Dr. Joy DeGruy’s “Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome” on YouTube (5 minute Intro) / 1 hour 21 minute full presentation
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • Musical intro: Ice-T “Mind Over Matter” (YouTube)
  • News story–
  • RESOURCE: Association of Black Psychologists  Here
  • New York Chapter: ABPSi

DO THIS for week 16–Monday December 12

This class will be a structured review/open Q&A for the final. My prepared presentation will cover the format of our exam itself and a general approach to essay exams. We’ll answer any open questions and collectively brainstorm some approaches. Please bring Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies textbook with you also, since the second half of the class will be a review for the final exam.

Read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF), which will help you begin to prepare for our final (and hopefully others as well). It summarizes much of what is usually in my prep sessions.

Final Exam Info:

Monday December 19 from 6:15-8:15 PM in usual classroom–in person on campus only.

Format: 2 essays on events from second half of semester only. More details forthcoming next week.

Remember the materials to help you review on this website:

  • Scroll through the weekly Course Updates posts for a quick overview of the entire semester’s work (and reading questions)
  • My own Lecture Notes

 

DAY section week 15: Black Economics

 

Jacob Lawrence (1917 – 2000) “The Carpenters” 1946

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE DAY SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE NIGHT SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site

Course Announcements:

  • Final exam is for the DAY SECTION class is Wednesday December 21 from 1-3 PM in usual classroom–in person on campus only. Don’t miss it
  • Our last class meeting is Monday December 12
  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Mondays/Wednesdays from 4-5 PM on Zoom here or on campus in Carman 291. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381.
  • Spring 2023 Course: For those interested, I’ll be teaching African American History (AAS 245) meeting Monday nights on campus.

Quick highlights from Week 14 classes:

  • (almost) finished Chapter 7 on Black politics in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • Musical intro: Richard Pryor’s “The First Black President” skit from his TV variety show (1977)
  • BEGAN prep sessions for final exam: continued on Monday 12/12

DO THIS for week 15

FOR Monday November 21

REVIEW section 7.8 (Coalitions and alliances) from chapter 7 (Black Politics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. (Approx. 4 pages)

READ sections 8.1-8.4 (FINISH the “Problems of Race and Class” subsection) from chapter 8 (Black Economics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. (Approx. 14 pages) 

Skim (read quickly for the key points) section 8.3 (Economic disadvantage data) to draw conclusions about trends and similarities in various data sets. Read section 8.2 (Colonial analogy) slowly and carefully. 

FOR Wednesday November 23

READ sections 8.5-8.7 (FINISH the chapter) from chapter 8 (Black Economics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. (Approx. 12 pages) 

What to read for:

TBA

ATTEND the class on Monday November 21

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

Additional Resources:

  •  

What’s Next?

TBA

 

NIGHT section Week 15: Black Psychology Part 2

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE NIGHT SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site

Course Announcements:

  • Final exam is Monday December 19 from 6:15-8:15 PM in usual classroom–in person on campus only. Don’t miss it
  • Midterms have been returned to your email address.
  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Mondays/Wednesdays from 4-5 PM on Zoom here or on campus in Carman 291. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. [NO OFFICE HOURS THIS WEDNESDAY. (Even I have to take a break once in a while …)]
  • Spring 2023 Courses: For those interested, I’ll be teaching Introduction to Africana Studies (AAS 166). There’ll be in-person sections on Tuesday night and M/W afternoon. I’ll also have one section of African American History (AAS 245) that meets Monday night on campus.

Quick highlights from Week 14 (11/28)’s class:

  • Reviewed the first half of Chapter 10 on Black Psychology in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • In-class video: Dr. Wade Nobles’s “A Brief History of ABPSi” on YouTube
  • In-class video: Dr. Joy DeGruy’s “Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome” on YouTube (5 minute Intro) / 1 hour 21 minute full presentation
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • Musical intro: Jimi Hendrix
  • News story–
  • RESOURCE: Association of Black Psychologists  Here
  • New York Chapter: ABPSi

DO THIS for week 15–Monday December 5

Read the following:

1-READ the second half of chapter 10 (Black Psychology-pp. 408-422)) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies which has the following sections:

  • The Radical School (10.3)
  • Ethos (10.4)

2-Amos N. Wilson: “The Social Bases of Self-Esteem” from Awakening the Natural Genius of Black Children. (10 pp PDF on the Readings page)

3-Additional reading TBA

This class session will also have the first part of review for the final exam

What to read for:

Chapter 10 gives an overview of the broad field of Black Psychology. It starts with a brief overview of the history followed by specific examples of practitioners who began to shape the response to their field, followed by the developments of the 1970s and beyond where a more defined response rooted in culture and experiences of African people outside of dominant theories takes hold. This week, focus on the different approaches of the people summarized in this week’s section of the textbook and read the section “Ethos” (10.4) slowly and carefully. Think about Wilson’s arguments for positive self esteem in children.

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

Additional Resources:

What’s Next?

TBA

 

NIGHT section week 14: Black Psychology Part 1

Photo: Dr. Wade Nobles

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE NIGHT SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site

 

Quick highlights from Week 13 (11/21)’s class:

  • Reviewed Chapter 7 on Black Economics in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages ).
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • Musical intro: Wu Tang Clan’s “C.R.E.A.M.” Listen on YouTube
  • News story–Bloomberg: “How America’s Wealth Gap Shaped the Modern Economy” (YouTube)
  • RESOURCE: National Urban League’s “State of Black America” Report. Here

DO THIS for week 13–Monday November 28

For this week, there are 3 texts: 1) part of chapter 10 (Black Psychology) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies 2) an article from Dr. Wade Nobles 3) a video from Dr. Joy DeGruy.

1-READ the first half of chapter 10 (Black Psychology-pp. 397-407–10 pages) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies which has the following sections:

  • Intro and historical origins (10.1, 10.2)
  • 3 major schools: differences between approaches (10.3)

We’ll read the second half (different theorists in the “Radical School”) next week.

2-READ Dr. Wade Nobles’s article “Fractured Consciousness, Shattered Identity: Black Psychology and the Restoration of the African Psyche” from the Journal of Black Psychology. 9 pages. PDF linked here. (Courtesy of his website.)

3-WATCH Dr. Joy DeGruy introduce her theory of Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome:

4-(OPTIONAL)-Dr. Wade Nobles’s article “From Black Psychology to Sakhu Djaer: Implications for the Further Development of a Pan African Psychology” from the Journal of Black Psychology. PDF link here.

What to read for:

Chapter 10 gives an overview of the broad field of Black Psychology. It starts with a brief overview of the history followed by specific examples of practitioners who began to shape the response to their field, followed by the developments of the 1970s and beyond where a more defined response rooted in culture and experiences of African people outside of dominant theories takes hold. This week, focus on understanding the structure of the field and history from the reading in the textbook. For the reading and video by Drs. Nobles and DeGruy, think about their theories of collective trauma and how this shapes overall responses. If there are any psychology or social work majors, think about how this approach might shape your own ways of operating.

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

Additional Resources:

What’s Next?

Chapter 8 (Psychology) part 2 in Introduction to Black Studies

DAY section week 14: Black Politics, continued

Photo: Shirley Chisholm—the first African American woman elected to Congress. (Image courtesy of Women Make Movies)

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE DAY SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE NIGHT SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site

Course Announcements:

  • NO CLASS MEETING ON WEDNESDAY 11/23 (Day before the big holiday. Check schedules for you other classes, which might still meet)
  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Monday/Wednesday from 4-5 PM! on Zoom here. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. Or drop by Carman 291.

Quick highlights from Week 12 (11/14, 11/16)’s class:

  • COINTINUED the parts of Chapter 7 on the Black politics in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies
  • My lecture notes are in the usual spot

DO THIS for week 14

Monday November 28

Read SECTIONS of chapter 7 (Black Politics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies.

Read sections 7.4,(The Jackson Campaign) 7.5 (The Historic Election of Barack Hussein Obama), and 7.6  (Black Elected Officials) for Monday

WATCH my interview on Eric Adams (40 Minutes) [Different video coming soon]
Wednesday November 30

FINISH Chapter 7: Read sections 7.7 (interest Group Politics)) 7.8 (Coalitions and Alliances)

What to read for:

Chapter 7 takes a broad look at political engagement from Kemet to the experience in the US. Think about what rooting political responses in ancient texts does. Review the “Crusian Paradigm” from chapter 6 on social organization and think about how that relates to/shapes political engagement. Also think about how the chapter frames political engagement as more than just the electoral process–and indeed what goes into the electoral process behind the scenes.

Focus on the expectations of Black elected officials and then compare that with the limitations on what they can sometimes do

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Second half of chapter 7 (Politics) in Introduction to Black Studies

DAY section week 13: Black Politics

Photo: It’s Nation Time. Amiri Baraka. Black Forum Records (Motown). 1972.

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE DAY SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site

Course Announcements:

  • IN-CLASS QUIZ ON SECTIONS OF CHAPTER 6 MONDAY 11/21! [Note new and final date!]
    • Sections 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, and 6.7
    • Focus on Ghetto/ghettoization, race, class, culture, pathology, Black family, and relations and quality relations & “the connections”
  • NO CLASS MEETING ON WEDNESDAY 11/23 (Day before the big holiday. Check schedules for you other classes, which might still meet)
  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Monday/Wednesday from 4-5 PM! on Zoom here. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. Or drop by Carman 291.

Quick highlights from Week 12 (11/14, 11/16)’s class:

DO THIS for week 13

Monday November 21

Quiz on sections of chapter 6

Read SECTIONS of chapter 7 (Black Politics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies.

Read sections 7.2 (Politics in the US Context) and -7.3 (Party politics) for Monday

Wednesday November 23

Class will not meet.

What to read for:

Chapter 7 takes a broad look at political engagement from Kemet to the experience in the US. Think about what rooting political responses in ancient texts does. Review the “Crusian Paradigm” from chapter 6 on social organization and think about how that relates to/shapes political engagement. Also think about how the chapter frames political engagement as more than just the electoral process–and indeed what goes into the electoral process behind the scenes.

Focus on the expectations of Black elected officials and then compare that with the limitations on what they can sometimes do

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Second half of chapter 7 (Politics) in Introduction to Black Studies

NIGHT section week 13: Black Economics

Jacob Lawrence (1917 – 2000) “The Carpenters” 1946

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE NIGHT SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site
  • Conference of the Midwest regional chapter of ASCAC (Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations) runs from November 18-20 online. Details and registration here

Course Announcements:

  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Monday/Wednesday from 4-5 PM! on Zoom here. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. Or drop by Carman 291.

Quick highlights from Week 12 (11/14)’s class:

  • NPR News story: “Birth Workers in Kansas are Addressing the State’s High Rate of Infant Mortality.” Here. Links made to chapter 6
  • Reviewed Chapter 7 on Black politics in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • Musical intro: Comedy duo Key and Peele’s “Obama Meet and Greet” skit. Extra: Richard Pryor’s “The First Black President” skit from his TV variety show (1977)

DO THIS for week 13–Monday November 21

READ all of chapter 8 (Black Economics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. (Approx. 25 pages)

What to read for:

TBA

ATTEND the class on Monday November 21

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

Additional Resources:

What’s Next?

TBA

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.