Spring 21 Final Exam

First, a few housekeeping details:

Course announcements

  • ASSIGNMENTS UPDATE: I’ve dropped the 2nd written assignment. Instead, the points for that will go to either the 1st assignment or final exam: whichever one is your highest grade.
  • Additional discussion board post: read/comment on this post on one of the essays in chapter 11 (critical thinking) by May 24 for credit!
  • Scroll down this page for final exam logistics
  • Zoom office hours on Monday 5/17 from 6-8 PM. Drop in using the link here.

Study break/Events

  • Event: Malcolm X birthday commemoration. Livestream of the ceremony @ the gravesite from 11 AM-2 PM. Watch the stream here
  • Event: Black Power march on 125th St for Malcolm’s birthday. Rally @ 12 noon; march along 125th St. from 1-4 PM. Details at the December 12 Movement’s website.

Need another fall course?

  • Contemporary Urban Writers (ENG 229) meets synchronously online Tu/Th 3:30-4:45 PM. It’s a writing intensive survey of Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Black writers and their views of the city. Details and fuller description at the course website.
  • African American History (AAS/HIS 245) meets synchronously online Wednesdays from 6-8:40 PM. Details and fuller description at the course website.
  • US Latin@ Literature (ENG/AAS 339) meets synchronously online Thursdays from 6-8:40 PM. Details and fuller description at the course website.

Quick highlights from Week 15 (5/12)’s class:

  • Covered chapter 8 (Black Economics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies.
  • Lecture notes in the usual spot. This includes some exam prep info.
  • Zoom wait music: KRS-One and Boogie Down Production’s “Love’s Gonna Get’cha (Material Love).” On Youtube
  • Break music: Pharaoh Sanders’s “Balance” from Izipho Zam. On Youtube.

Final Exam Info:

  • The final exam will be posted on the Final Exam page and the format will be a single essay question. You’ll have a choice of topics.
  • The exam will be visible starting on Sunday morning May 16th
  • There is no time limit
  • Format will be a single essay question. You’ll have a choice of questions
  • You can complete and return it anytime between Sunday May 16 and 11:59 PM Wednesday May 19
  • Submission will be via a Dropbox upload link on the Submissions Page, like we’ve used for papers all semester
  • Topics will be limited to what we’ve covered in chapters 6, 7, 8, and 10

Read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF), which will help you begin to prepare for our final (and hopefully others as well). It summarizes much of what is usually in my prep sessions.

Remember the materials to help you review on this website:

  • Scroll through the weekly posts for a quick overview of the entire semester’s work (and reading questions)
  • My own Lecture Notes
  • Your own weekly discussion board posts

Help/ questions: I’ll be prioritizing exam-related emails this week. Please use the subject line “Final Exam Help” for finals-related questions only. I’ll respond within a couple of hours during the daytime and almost immediately between 6-8 PM Monday and Wednesday evenings. Simple questions will be quickest to answer: I might ask you to call me on Zoom if it’s too much to sort out.

Office hours Zoom: No more Zoom class meets (obviously), but I’ll have Zoom office hours on Monday 5/17 from 6-8 PM. Drop in using the link here.

Read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF), which will help you begin to prepare for our final (and hopefully others as well). It summarizes much of what is usually in my prep sessions.

See my final exam presentation from the last Zoom session–posted on the Lecture Notes page. (It summarizes what’s in the “Zen and the Art of Finals” PDF file.)

Remember the materials to help you review on this website:

  • Scroll through the weekly Course Updates posts for a quick overview of the entire semester’s work (and reading questions)
  • My own Lecture Notes

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

End of semester freestyle: We’ve made it (almost) all the way to the end of another semester. It’s honestly been hard for me to concentrate and keep up with everything and I’ve tried very hard, but wish I’d done more/ been more on point / fill in the blank. You’ve all been incredibly patient with me the whole semester and the engagement with my lectures and the discussion boards has really been impressive. I’m trying to return the favor. Right now we’re all learning much bigger stuff than anything I could’ve planned to teach and we’re sorting it out in real time as we learn new ways of being with/ among/ part of each other in New York City. Which I guess really is the point of the class, after all. But I’ll shut up now before this becomes a book. Anyway, thank all of you for being you … and for just being. Sometimesit’s good to think about nostalgic, carefree versions of life as we thought it once was and hope it might be again. Before he became a leading man, Will Smith was half of the duo Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince. Their ode to a carefree, simpler summer resides below. In the words of the late Amiri Baraka, may we “all, all , all, ALL, survive. I wish you … good luck.”

Week 15: Black Economics

Jacob Lawrence (1917 – 2000) “The Carpenters” 1946

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • ASSIGNMENTS UPDATE: I’ve dropped the 2nd written assignment. Instead, the points for that will go to the 1st assignment or final exam: whichever one is your highest grade
  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Weekly discussion post update: Remember to keep up with your comments/replies! It’s okay to comment on both this and last week’s post with different comments

Quick highlights from Week 14 (5/5)’s class:

  • Class cancelled

For Wednesday 5/12, (Week 15), read all of chapter 8 (Black Economics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. Same assignment as last week.

  • Begin reviewing for final exam

What to read for:

TBA

RESPOND to one idea in the textbook chapter and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday May 12

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

Additional Resources:

What’s Next?

Online final exam: see below

Final Exam Info:

  • The final exam will be posted on the website and the format will be a single essay question. You’ll have a choice of topics.
  • You can complete and return it anytime between Sunday May 16 and Tuesday May 18
  • Submission will be via a Dropbox upload link, like we’ve used for papers all semester
  • Topics will be limited to what we’ve covered in chapters 6, 7, 8, and 10

Read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF), which will help you begin to prepare for our final (and hopefully others as well). It summarizes much of what is usually in my prep sessions.

Remember the materials to help you review on this website:

  • Scroll through the weekly posts for a quick overview of the entire semester’s work (and reading questions)
  • My own Lecture Notes

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 14: Black Economics [UPDATE: CLASS CANCELLED 5/5]

Jacob Lawrence (1917 – 2000) “The Carpenters” 1946

UPDATE: CLASS CANCELLED FOR WED. 5/5. PLEASE CHECK BACK FOR UPDATE ON NEXT WEEK FOR OUR LAST CLASS SESSION ON 5/12.

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • ASSIGNMENTS UPDATE: the second written assignment has been dropped: we will now only have an online final exam in exam week. To make up for this, whichever of the assessments (first paper or final) you have a higher grade on will now be count for more than the other one.
  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Weekly discussion post update: Remember to keep up with your comments/replies!

Quick highlights from Week 12 (4/21)’s class:

  • Guest lecture by Mut Nfr KaRa, MSW on culturally responsive responses to school counseling
  • Reviewed the second half of Chapter 10 on Black Psychology in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • Musical intro: sneak peek of Makeda Kumasi’s “Maat.” Look for her upcoming release (9) A Spoken Word Experience
  • Musical break: Pharaoh Sanders “Hum Allah” Listen on YouTube

For Wednesday 5/5, (Week 14), read all of chapter 8 (Black Economics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies 

What to read for:

TBA

RESPOND to one idea in the textbook chapter or the PDF and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday May 5

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

Additional Resources:

What’s Next?

TBA

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 13: Black Psychology Part 2

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Weekly discussion post update: Remember to keep up with your comments/replies!

Quick highlights from Week 12 (4/14)’s class:

  • Reviewed the first half of Chapter 10 on Black Psychology in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • In-class video: Dr. Wade Nobles’s “A Brief History of ABPSi” on YouTube
  • In-class video: Dr. Joy DeGruy’s “Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome” on YouTube (5 minute Intro) / 1 hour 21 minute full presentation
  • Musical intro: Ice-T’s “Mind Over Matter” Listen on YouTube
  • Musical interlude: James Brown “Mind Power” Listen on YouTube

For Wednesday 4/28, (Week 13), there are 2 texts: 1) part of chapter 10 (Black Psychology) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies 2) an article from Dr. Amos Wilson, which is a PDF located on the readings page

Class will start with a guest speaker for approx. the first hour on African-centered social work practice:

Karen C.W. Drakeford LCSW, APP – (aka Mut Nfrt Ka Raet, or Nfr KaRa for short. Translated: the deep mothering energy from within that emanates goodness from the enlightened spirit), principal of Mut’s Mer, LTD. She received her undergraduate degree in psychology from The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD and her masters in social work from Hunter College in New York City. She is also certified in hypnotherapy, play therapy, polarity and wholistic consultations. Karen Drakeford has trained with holistic experts such as Dr. Llaila Afrika, Dr. John Beaulieu and Queen Afua.

Ms. Drakeford’s world travels and studies have allowed her to infuse sensitivity to a diverse spectrum of cultures. She has worked as a clinical social worker in the New York City Public Schools for more than twenty years and maintains a private practice in which she works with children, adults, couples and families. Her practice infuses a variety of traditional and holistic approaches.

For the second half of class, read the following:

1-READ the second half of chapter 10 (Black Psychology-pp. 408-422)) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies which has the following sections:

  • The Radical School (10.3)
  • Ethos (10.4)

2-Amos N. Wilson: “The Social Bases of Self-Esteem” from Awakening the Natural Genius of Black Children. (10 pp PDF on the Readings page)

What to read for:

Chapter 10 gives an overview of the broad field of Black Psychology. It starts with a brief overview of the history followed by specific examples of practitioners who began to shape the response to their field, followed by the developments of the 1970s and beyond where a more defined response rooted in culture and experiences of African people outside of dominant theories takes hold. This week, focus on the different approaches of the people summarized in this week’s section of the textbook and read the section “Ethos” (10.4) slowly and carefully. Think about Wilson’s arguments for positive self esteem in children.

RESPOND to one idea in the textbook chapter or the PDF and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday April 28

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

Additional Resources:

What’s Next?

TBA

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 12: Black Psychology Part 1

Photo: Dr. Wade Nobles

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Weekly discussion post update: both sections of Chapter 6 are open for one more week for comments. After that, comment field on all posts will close after 14 days. So remember to keep up with your comments/replies! You still have 6 weeks to catch up on comments if you’ve fallen behind!
  • Scholarships:
    • The St. George’s Society of NY Scholarship is for students with heritage from British Commonwealth countries. Deadline is May 31. The scholarship application with full details is here and Lehman’s scholarship office asks that you email them before applying at: scholarship [dot] office [at] lehman [dot] cuny [dot] edu
  • Zoom events
    • The Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations (ASCAC) conference runs from April 9-17 on Zoom. Details here

Quick highlights from Week 11 (4/15)’s class:

  • Reviewed Chapter 7 on Black Politics in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 265-283).
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • Musical intro: DMX’s “Who We Be” Listen on YouTube
  • Musical interlude: Jazzmeia Horn “Afro Blue/ Eye See You/ Wade in the Water (Medley)” Listen on YouTube

For Wednesday 4/21, (Week 12), there are 3 texts: 1) part of chapter 10 (Black Psychology) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies 2) an article from Dr. Wade Nobles 3) a video from Dr. Joy DeGruy

1-READ the first half of chapter 10 (Black Psychology-pp. 397-407)) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies which has the following sections:

  • Intro and historical origins (10.1, 10.2)
  • 3 major schools: differences between approaches (10.3)

We’ll read the second half (different theorists in the “Radical School”) next week.

2-READ Dr. Wade Nobles’s article “Fractured Consciousness, Shattered Identity: Black Psychology and the Restoration of the African Psyche” from the Journal of Black Psychology. 9 pages. PDF linked here. (Courtesy of his website.)

3-WATCH Dr. Joy DeGruy introduce her theory of Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome:

4-(OPTIONAL)-Dr. Wade Nobles’s article “From Black Psychology to Sakhu Djaer: Implications for the Further Development of a Pan African Psychology” from the Journal of Black Psychology. PDF link here.

What to read for:

Chapter 10 gives an overview of the broad field of Black Psychology. It starts with a brief overview of the history followed by specific examples of practitioners who began to shape the response to their field, followed by the developments of the 1970s and beyond where a more defined response rooted in culture and experiences of African people outside of dominant theories takes hold. This week, focus on understanding the structure of the field and history from the reading in the textbook. For the reading and video by Drs. Nobles and DeGruy, think about their theories of collective trauma and how this shapes overall responses. If there are any psychology or social work majors, think about how this approach might shape your own ways of operating.

RESPOND to one idea in the textbook chapter or the PDF and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday April 14

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

Additional Resources:

What’s Next?

Chapter 8 (Psychology) part 2 in Introduction to Black Studies

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 11: Black Politics

 

Photo: It’s Nation Time. Amiri Baraka. Black Forum Records (Motown). 1972.

 

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Scholarships:
    • The Puerto Rican Day Parade Scholarship deadline is April 16. Details here
    • The St. George’s Society of NY Scholarship is for students with heritage from British Commonwealth countries. Deadline is May 21. The scholarship application with full details is here and Lehman’s scholarship office asks that you email them before applying at: scholarship [dot] office [at] lehman [dot] cuny [dot] edu
  • Zoom events
    • The Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations (ASCAC) conference runs from April 9-17 on Zoom. Details here

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • Audio of the weekly classes is on the  Zoom archive page. Same password as everything else to access.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

Quick highlights from Week 8 (4/7)’s class:

For Wednesday 4/14, (Week 11), there is one readings to do.

Read all of chapter 7 (Black Politics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies.

Also read “Kwame Nkrumah, The Political Rehearsal: His American Years” (101-113) in Dr. Clarke’s Notes for an African World Revolution. Also read “On Leadership” (pp.33-34) and “On Alliances” (pp. 39-40). [Edit: no additional reading–just the textbook chapter.]

What to read for:

Chapter 7 takes a broad look at political engagement from Kemet to the experience in the US. Think about what rooting political responses in ancient texts does. Review the “Crusian Paradigm” from chapter 6 on social organization and think about how that relates to/shapes political engagement. Also think about how the chapter frames political engagement as more than just the electoral process–and indeed what goes into the electoral process behind the scenes.

RESPOND to one idea in the textbook chapter or the PDF and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday April 14

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Chapter 8 (Psychology) in Introduction to Black Studies

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

 

Week 10: Black relationships and Africana Womanism

Image: Friends. Elizabeth Catlett (1915-2012). via Princeton University Art Museum collection.

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • No class meeting next week (Week 9) spring break!
  • Keep working on the first written assignment. Download it on the assignments page. Use the submissions page to turn it in when done.
  • Scholarships:
    •  Dominican Day Parade Scholarship deadline is March 30! Details/application here
    • The St. George’s Society of NY Scholarship is for students with heritage from British Commonwealth countries. Deadline is May 21. The scholarship application with full details is here and Lehman’s scholarship office asks that you email them before applying at: scholarship [dot] office [at] lehman [dot] cuny [dot] edu
    • The Puerto Rican Day Parade Scholarship deadline is April 16. Details here
  • Zoom events
    • “Black Women Who Hold Up Half the Sky,” hosted by CEMOTAP. Sat. 2/27, 2 PM. Facebook event details here

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • Audio of the weekly classes is on the  Zoom archive page. Same password as everything else to access.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

Quick highlights from Week 8 (3/24)’s class:

  • Reviewed the parts of Chapter 6 on sociology and the Black Family  in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 250-268).
  • My lecture notes are in the usual spot
  • Resource/for further reading: Joyce Ladner The Death of White Sociology
  • Zoom wait music: Salt n’ Pepa’s “Heaven or Hell”: on YouTube here (with an excellent video)
  • Intermission music:  Nana Camille Yarbrough’s “Tell It” and “Can I Get a Witness” from her Ancestor House CD. On YouTube here and here.
  • See the PBS series Race: the Power of an Illusion for a quick overview of housing segregation/wealth accumulation in the US. Lots of good stuff at the companion website. Housing discrimination in the US by official government policy as an example of institutional racism (racism supported/done by official institutions/governments.) See a 30-minute clip on Vimeo.

For Wednesday 4/7, (Week 10), there are two readings to do. (Week 9 is spring break.)

Finish chapter 6 in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. Read last part of the chapter (pp. 268-285) on the various feminisms/womanisms and the section on relationships, with a focus on “the connections.”

[Additional reading TBA on Saturday 3/27 as PDF file]

What to read for:

The second half of chapter 6 deals with varying approaches to gender studies and relationships in Africana Studies. Think about how the foundation of quality relationships is framed here.

RESPOND to one idea in the textbook chapter or the PDF and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday April 7

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Chapter 7 (Politics) in Introduction to Black Studies

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 8: Black Sociology

Image: US American Black. Faith Ringgold. via artist’s website. 1969. Oil on canvas. 60 x 84″. From Ringgold’s “Black Light” series.

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Get a copy of the required course book if you haven’t done so already. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester. No more PDFs of chapters will be posted. Lehman’s bookstore claims to now have rental copies in stock: check with them.

The first written assignment was announced in Wednesday’s Zoom session. Download it on the assignments page. Use the submissions page to turn it in when done.

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • Audio of the weekly classes is on the  Zoom archive page. Same password as everything else to access.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

Quick highlights from Week 7 (3/17):

  • Reviewed Chapter 5 in Introduction to Black Studies
  • Reviewed Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s essay “Image and Mind Control in the African World.”
  • Announced first assignment: see the Assignments page for details
  • See the Lecture Notes page for a copy of my presentation
  • Zoom wait music: Alice Coltrane’s: “Blue Nile”–on YouTube here
  • Intermission music: Haki Madhubuti’s’s “Rise, Vision, Comin” from Rise, Vision, Comin–on YouTube here

Announcements:

  • Lehman’s pre-graduate advising program offers weekly office hours for the graduate school application process and is having two sessions via Zoom. Wednesday March 24 addresses admissions interviews. Details and Zoom link at their website.

For Wednesday 3/24, (Week 8), there are two readings to do.

  • Read up to section 6.6 (pp. 249-268) of chapter 6 (Black Sociology) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. (18 pages total)
  • Read Charles V. Hamilton’s “Black Social Scientists: Contributions and Problems” and Becky Thompson’s “Reflections on Ethics in Research” Joyce Ladner’s “Tomorrow’s Tomorrow: The Black Woman” from The Death of White Sociology. (15 pages: PDF document on the Readings pageComing Saturday Posted)

What to read for:

The first half of chapter 6 deals with social science approaches of studying/analyzing Black communities, families, and life. Think about how the approaches presented deal with issues of methodology (how research is done and what questions are asked), impartiality and objectivity in research, and the relationship of the researcher to the subject. Try to understand:

  • Issues of ghettoization
  • culture and the different models
  • issues of studying Black family relations and the various approaches

From the PDF reading, think about how Hamilton and Thompson Ladner critique[s] dominant social science theories of approaching research. Reflect on how these issues have been presented in your own classes.

RESPOND to one idea in the textbook chapter or the PDF and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday March 24

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Second half of Chapter 6 in Introduction to Black Studies

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 7: Black Religion

Image: Ethel Shariff in Chicago, 1963. By Gordon Parks (1912-2006)

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Get a copy of the required course book if you haven’t done so already. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester. No more PDFs of chapters will be posted. Lehman’s bookstore claims to now have rental copies in stock: check with them.

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • Audio of the weekly classes is on the  Zoom archive page. Same password as everything else to access.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

Announcement:

Lehman’s pre-graduate advising program offers weekly office hours for the graduate school application process and is having two sessions via Zoom. Wednesday March 24 addresses admissions interviews. Details and Zoom link at their website.

For Wednesday 3/17, there are two things to read.

  • Selections from Chapter 5 in Introduction to Black Studies
  • Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s essay “Image and Mind Control in the African World.” (PDF on Readings page.) Read this first to gain a conceptual understanding for Karenga’s approach in the textbook chapter

For chapter 5 in (Black Religion) Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies.

  • Read pages 189-222, 225 (Black Christian Womanist Theology) and the section on the Nation of Islam/Malcolm X (232-239) only.
  • Focus on the sections on:
    • The Dogon Tradition,
    • Maat,
    • Social Ethics of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X
    • Black Liberation Theology
  • Read for the following:
    • How central tenets (beliefs) of the Dogon and Maat shape the worldview of African people
    • How Dr. King and Malcolm X’s interpretations of Islam and Christianity form a challenge to the US

For Dr. Clarke’s “Image and Mind Control in the African World.”

  • Pay attention to how Dr. Clarke frames religion and religious images
  • What role does Clarke suggest religion should play?
  • How does religion shape people’s view of the world, according to Dr. Clarke?

Quick highlights from Week 6 (3/10):

  • Reviewed sections of Chapter 4 on Civil Rights-Black Power in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 150-168).
  • Reviewed Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s essay “Malcolm X: the Genesis of His African Revolution” (pp. 139-159) in Notes for an African World Revolution.
  • See the Lecture Notes page for a copy of my presentation with highlights from the text
  • Zoom wait music: Sarah Webster Fabio: “Together to the Tune of Coltrane’s Equinox”–on YouTube here
  • Intermission music: Jackie McLean’s “Melody for Melonae” from Let Freedom Ring–on YouTube here
  • Resource/for further reading: Peniel E. Joseph’s Waiting ‘Til the Midnight Hour a narrative history of the Black Power movement. In the CUNY library system here, the NYPL here, and you can buy it used online starting at about $5.

RESPOND to one idea in the textbook chapter or Dr. Clarke’s essay and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday March 17

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

First half of Chapter 6 in Introduction to Black Studies

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 6: Africans in America Part 2

2014.11 Elizabeth Catlett
Sculpture
Black Unity, 1968
21 in. × 12 1/2 in. × 24 in. (53.3 × 31.8 × 61 cm)

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Get a copy of the two required course book if you haven’t done so already. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester.  The bookstore claims to now have rental copies in stock: check with them.
  • There’s a class WhatsApp group that is helpful–or so I’m told since I’m not on it. Anyhow, check it out if you haven’t yet.
  • PDF file of chapter 4 is on the Readings page for those still waiting for the book.

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • Audio of the weekly classes is on the  Zoom archive page. Same password as everything else to access.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

Announcement:

Lehman’s pre-graduate advising program offers weekly office hours for the graduate school application process and is having two sessions via Zoom. Wednesday March 11 will cover writing personal statements and Wednesday March 24 addresses admissions interviews. Details and Zoom link at their website.

Quick highlights from fourth class on 3/3

What to do for Week 6–March 10:

  • Read: the first half of Chapter 4 (Africans in America) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (Sections 4.1-4.9 only; pages 105-147:
    • Pay special attention to the subsections on The Holocaust of Enslavement, System of Enslavement, Reconstruction, Booker T. Washington, WEB DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Ida B. Wells
    • Pay special attention to Critical Thinking questions 1 and 3 on p. 185, especially the comparisons between the people named above
    • More focused questions TBA
  •  Read “African American Historians and the Reclaiming of African History” by Dr. John Henrik Clarke (PDF on the Readings page)
  • Read: the second half of Chapter 4 (Africans in America) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (Sections 4.11-4.12 only; pages 150-168). (PDF on the Readings page)
    • Pay special attention to the following sections: Civil Rights Movement, Black Power Movement, Political Thrust, Cultural Thrust
  •  Read “Malcolm X: The Genesis of His African Revolution” (pp. 139-158) in Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s Africans at the Crossroads: Notes for an African World Revolution (PDF on the Readings page on Saturday.)

    • Think about Clarke’s assessment of Malcolm X. Compare this to what you read last week on Garvey/Washington/DuBois. Make a few brief notes on this–just a few sentences or bullet points is fine.

RESPOND to one idea in the chapter and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday March 10

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • TBA

What’s Next?

Chapter 5 in Introduction to Black Studies

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.