Week 12: Black Psychology Part 1

Photo: Dr. Wade Nobles

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Weekly discussion post update: both sections of Chapter 6 are open for one more week for comments. After that, comment field on all posts will close after 14 days. So remember to keep up with your comments/replies! You still have 6 weeks to catch up on comments if you’ve fallen behind!
  • Scholarships:
    • The St. George’s Society of NY Scholarship is for students with heritage from British Commonwealth countries. Deadline is May 31. The scholarship application with full details is here and Lehman’s scholarship office asks that you email them before applying at: scholarship [dot] office [at] lehman [dot] cuny [dot] edu
  • Zoom events
    • The Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations (ASCAC) conference runs from April 9-17 on Zoom. Details here

Quick highlights from Week 11 (4/15)’s class:

  • Reviewed Chapter 7 on Black Politics in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 265-283).
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • Musical intro: DMX’s “Who We Be” Listen on YouTube
  • Musical interlude: Jazzmeia Horn “Afro Blue/ Eye See You/ Wade in the Water (Medley)” Listen on YouTube

For Wednesday 4/21, (Week 12), there are 3 texts: 1) part of chapter 10 (Black Psychology) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies 2) an article from Dr. Wade Nobles 3) a video from Dr. Joy DeGruy

1-READ the first half of chapter 10 (Black Psychology-pp. 397-407)) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies which has the following sections:

  • Intro and historical origins (10.1, 10.2)
  • 3 major schools: differences between approaches (10.3)

We’ll read the second half (different theorists in the “Radical School”) next week.

2-READ Dr. Wade Nobles’s article “Fractured Consciousness, Shattered Identity: Black Psychology and the Restoration of the African Psyche” from the Journal of Black Psychology. 9 pages. PDF linked here. (Courtesy of his website.)

3-WATCH Dr. Joy DeGruy introduce her theory of Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome:

4-(OPTIONAL)-Dr. Wade Nobles’s article “From Black Psychology to Sakhu Djaer: Implications for the Further Development of a Pan African Psychology” from the Journal of Black Psychology. PDF link here.

What to read for:

Chapter 10 gives an overview of the broad field of Black Psychology. It starts with a brief overview of the history followed by specific examples of practitioners who began to shape the response to their field, followed by the developments of the 1970s and beyond where a more defined response rooted in culture and experiences of African people outside of dominant theories takes hold. This week, focus on understanding the structure of the field and history from the reading in the textbook. For the reading and video by Drs. Nobles and DeGruy, think about their theories of collective trauma and how this shapes overall responses. If there are any psychology or social work majors, think about how this approach might shape your own ways of operating.

RESPOND to one idea in the textbook chapter or the PDF and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday April 14

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

Additional Resources:

What’s Next?

Chapter 8 (Psychology) part 2 in Introduction to Black Studies

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 11: Black Politics

 

Photo: It’s Nation Time. Amiri Baraka. Black Forum Records (Motown). 1972.

 

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Scholarships:
    • The Puerto Rican Day Parade Scholarship deadline is April 16. Details here
    • The St. George’s Society of NY Scholarship is for students with heritage from British Commonwealth countries. Deadline is May 21. The scholarship application with full details is here and Lehman’s scholarship office asks that you email them before applying at: scholarship [dot] office [at] lehman [dot] cuny [dot] edu
  • Zoom events
    • The Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations (ASCAC) conference runs from April 9-17 on Zoom. Details here

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • Audio of the weekly classes is on the  Zoom archive page. Same password as everything else to access.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

Quick highlights from Week 8 (4/7)’s class:

For Wednesday 4/14, (Week 11), there is one readings to do.

Read all of chapter 7 (Black Politics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies.

Also read “Kwame Nkrumah, The Political Rehearsal: His American Years” (101-113) in Dr. Clarke’s Notes for an African World Revolution. Also read “On Leadership” (pp.33-34) and “On Alliances” (pp. 39-40). [Edit: no additional reading–just the textbook chapter.]

What to read for:

Chapter 7 takes a broad look at political engagement from Kemet to the experience in the US. Think about what rooting political responses in ancient texts does. Review the “Crusian Paradigm” from chapter 6 on social organization and think about how that relates to/shapes political engagement. Also think about how the chapter frames political engagement as more than just the electoral process–and indeed what goes into the electoral process behind the scenes.

RESPOND to one idea in the textbook chapter or the PDF and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday April 14

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Chapter 8 (Psychology) in Introduction to Black Studies

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

 

Week 10: Black relationships and Africana Womanism

Image: Friends. Elizabeth Catlett (1915-2012). via Princeton University Art Museum collection.

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • No class meeting next week (Week 9) spring break!
  • Keep working on the first written assignment. Download it on the assignments page. Use the submissions page to turn it in when done.
  • Scholarships:
    •  Dominican Day Parade Scholarship deadline is March 30! Details/application here
    • The St. George’s Society of NY Scholarship is for students with heritage from British Commonwealth countries. Deadline is May 21. The scholarship application with full details is here and Lehman’s scholarship office asks that you email them before applying at: scholarship [dot] office [at] lehman [dot] cuny [dot] edu
    • The Puerto Rican Day Parade Scholarship deadline is April 16. Details here
  • Zoom events
    • “Black Women Who Hold Up Half the Sky,” hosted by CEMOTAP. Sat. 2/27, 2 PM. Facebook event details here

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • Audio of the weekly classes is on the  Zoom archive page. Same password as everything else to access.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

Quick highlights from Week 8 (3/24)’s class:

  • Reviewed the parts of Chapter 6 on sociology and the Black Family  in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 250-268).
  • My lecture notes are in the usual spot
  • Resource/for further reading: Joyce Ladner The Death of White Sociology
  • Zoom wait music: Salt n’ Pepa’s “Heaven or Hell”: on YouTube here (with an excellent video)
  • Intermission music:  Nana Camille Yarbrough’s “Tell It” and “Can I Get a Witness” from her Ancestor House CD. On YouTube here and here.
  • See the PBS series Race: the Power of an Illusion for a quick overview of housing segregation/wealth accumulation in the US. Lots of good stuff at the companion website. Housing discrimination in the US by official government policy as an example of institutional racism (racism supported/done by official institutions/governments.) See a 30-minute clip on Vimeo.

For Wednesday 4/7, (Week 10), there are two readings to do. (Week 9 is spring break.)

Finish chapter 6 in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. Read last part of the chapter (pp. 268-285) on the various feminisms/womanisms and the section on relationships, with a focus on “the connections.”

[Additional reading TBA on Saturday 3/27 as PDF file]

What to read for:

The second half of chapter 6 deals with varying approaches to gender studies and relationships in Africana Studies. Think about how the foundation of quality relationships is framed here.

RESPOND to one idea in the textbook chapter or the PDF and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday April 7

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Chapter 7 (Politics) in Introduction to Black Studies

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 8: Black Sociology

Image: US American Black. Faith Ringgold. via artist’s website. 1969. Oil on canvas. 60 x 84″. From Ringgold’s “Black Light” series.

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Get a copy of the required course book if you haven’t done so already. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester. No more PDFs of chapters will be posted. Lehman’s bookstore claims to now have rental copies in stock: check with them.

The first written assignment was announced in Wednesday’s Zoom session. Download it on the assignments page. Use the submissions page to turn it in when done.

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • Audio of the weekly classes is on the  Zoom archive page. Same password as everything else to access.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

Quick highlights from Week 7 (3/17):

  • Reviewed Chapter 5 in Introduction to Black Studies
  • Reviewed Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s essay “Image and Mind Control in the African World.”
  • Announced first assignment: see the Assignments page for details
  • See the Lecture Notes page for a copy of my presentation
  • Zoom wait music: Alice Coltrane’s: “Blue Nile”–on YouTube here
  • Intermission music: Haki Madhubuti’s’s “Rise, Vision, Comin” from Rise, Vision, Comin–on YouTube here

Announcements:

  • Lehman’s pre-graduate advising program offers weekly office hours for the graduate school application process and is having two sessions via Zoom. Wednesday March 24 addresses admissions interviews. Details and Zoom link at their website.

For Wednesday 3/24, (Week 8), there are two readings to do.

  • Read up to section 6.6 (pp. 249-268) of chapter 6 (Black Sociology) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. (18 pages total)
  • Read Charles V. Hamilton’s “Black Social Scientists: Contributions and Problems” and Becky Thompson’s “Reflections on Ethics in Research” Joyce Ladner’s “Tomorrow’s Tomorrow: The Black Woman” from The Death of White Sociology. (15 pages: PDF document on the Readings pageComing Saturday Posted)

What to read for:

The first half of chapter 6 deals with social science approaches of studying/analyzing Black communities, families, and life. Think about how the approaches presented deal with issues of methodology (how research is done and what questions are asked), impartiality and objectivity in research, and the relationship of the researcher to the subject. Try to understand:

  • Issues of ghettoization
  • culture and the different models
  • issues of studying Black family relations and the various approaches

From the PDF reading, think about how Hamilton and Thompson Ladner critique[s] dominant social science theories of approaching research. Reflect on how these issues have been presented in your own classes.

RESPOND to one idea in the textbook chapter or the PDF and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday March 24

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Second half of Chapter 6 in Introduction to Black Studies

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 7: Black Religion

Image: Ethel Shariff in Chicago, 1963. By Gordon Parks (1912-2006)

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Get a copy of the required course book if you haven’t done so already. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester. No more PDFs of chapters will be posted. Lehman’s bookstore claims to now have rental copies in stock: check with them.

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • Audio of the weekly classes is on the  Zoom archive page. Same password as everything else to access.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

Announcement:

Lehman’s pre-graduate advising program offers weekly office hours for the graduate school application process and is having two sessions via Zoom. Wednesday March 24 addresses admissions interviews. Details and Zoom link at their website.

For Wednesday 3/17, there are two things to read.

  • Selections from Chapter 5 in Introduction to Black Studies
  • Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s essay “Image and Mind Control in the African World.” (PDF on Readings page.) Read this first to gain a conceptual understanding for Karenga’s approach in the textbook chapter

For chapter 5 in (Black Religion) Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies.

  • Read pages 189-222, 225 (Black Christian Womanist Theology) and the section on the Nation of Islam/Malcolm X (232-239) only.
  • Focus on the sections on:
    • The Dogon Tradition,
    • Maat,
    • Social Ethics of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X
    • Black Liberation Theology
  • Read for the following:
    • How central tenets (beliefs) of the Dogon and Maat shape the worldview of African people
    • How Dr. King and Malcolm X’s interpretations of Islam and Christianity form a challenge to the US

For Dr. Clarke’s “Image and Mind Control in the African World.”

  • Pay attention to how Dr. Clarke frames religion and religious images
  • What role does Clarke suggest religion should play?
  • How does religion shape people’s view of the world, according to Dr. Clarke?

Quick highlights from Week 6 (3/10):

  • Reviewed sections of Chapter 4 on Civil Rights-Black Power in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 150-168).
  • Reviewed Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s essay “Malcolm X: the Genesis of His African Revolution” (pp. 139-159) in Notes for an African World Revolution.
  • See the Lecture Notes page for a copy of my presentation with highlights from the text
  • Zoom wait music: Sarah Webster Fabio: “Together to the Tune of Coltrane’s Equinox”–on YouTube here
  • Intermission music: Jackie McLean’s “Melody for Melonae” from Let Freedom Ring–on YouTube here
  • Resource/for further reading: Peniel E. Joseph’s Waiting ‘Til the Midnight Hour a narrative history of the Black Power movement. In the CUNY library system here, the NYPL here, and you can buy it used online starting at about $5.

RESPOND to one idea in the textbook chapter or Dr. Clarke’s essay and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday March 17

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

First half of Chapter 6 in Introduction to Black Studies

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 6: Africans in America Part 2

2014.11 Elizabeth Catlett
Sculpture
Black Unity, 1968
21 in. × 12 1/2 in. × 24 in. (53.3 × 31.8 × 61 cm)

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Get a copy of the two required course book if you haven’t done so already. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester.  The bookstore claims to now have rental copies in stock: check with them.
  • There’s a class WhatsApp group that is helpful–or so I’m told since I’m not on it. Anyhow, check it out if you haven’t yet.
  • PDF file of chapter 4 is on the Readings page for those still waiting for the book.

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • Audio of the weekly classes is on the  Zoom archive page. Same password as everything else to access.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

Announcement:

Lehman’s pre-graduate advising program offers weekly office hours for the graduate school application process and is having two sessions via Zoom. Wednesday March 11 will cover writing personal statements and Wednesday March 24 addresses admissions interviews. Details and Zoom link at their website.

Quick highlights from fourth class on 3/3

What to do for Week 6–March 10:

  • Read: the first half of Chapter 4 (Africans in America) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (Sections 4.1-4.9 only; pages 105-147:
    • Pay special attention to the subsections on The Holocaust of Enslavement, System of Enslavement, Reconstruction, Booker T. Washington, WEB DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Ida B. Wells
    • Pay special attention to Critical Thinking questions 1 and 3 on p. 185, especially the comparisons between the people named above
    • More focused questions TBA
  •  Read “African American Historians and the Reclaiming of African History” by Dr. John Henrik Clarke (PDF on the Readings page)
  • Read: the second half of Chapter 4 (Africans in America) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (Sections 4.11-4.12 only; pages 150-168). (PDF on the Readings page)
    • Pay special attention to the following sections: Civil Rights Movement, Black Power Movement, Political Thrust, Cultural Thrust
  •  Read “Malcolm X: The Genesis of His African Revolution” (pp. 139-158) in Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s Africans at the Crossroads: Notes for an African World Revolution (PDF on the Readings page on Saturday.)

    • Think about Clarke’s assessment of Malcolm X. Compare this to what you read last week on Garvey/Washington/DuBois. Make a few brief notes on this–just a few sentences or bullet points is fine.

RESPOND to one idea in the chapter and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday March 10

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • TBA

What’s Next?

Chapter 5 in Introduction to Black Studies

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 5: Africans in America Part 1

Image: Building More Stately Mansions. By Jacob Lawrence. 1944. Oil on Canvas, Fisk University Libraries, Nashville TN.

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Get a copy of the two required course book if you haven’t done so already. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester.  The bookstore claims to now have rental copies in stock: check with them.
  • There’s a class WhatsApp group that is helpful–or so I’m told since I’m not on it. Anyhow, check it out if you haven’t yet.
  • I’ll be post a PDF file of chapter 4 on the Readings page for those still waiting for the book: look for it Saturday

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • The sessions are being recorded. Audio on the  Zoom lectures page. Still figuring out the best way to post them. Stay tuned.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

Quick highlights from fourth class on 2/24

  • Website review
  • Zoom wait room music: Gary Bartz and Ntu Troop’s “I’ve Known Rivers
  • Musical selection: Randy Weston’s “African Cookbook.”
  • Reviewed Chapter 3 from Introduction to Black Studies
  • See the Lecture Notes page for a PDF of the slide deck presented in class
  • UPDATE: Zoom audio now posted on the Zoom lectures page. (Same password as everything else on the site.)

What to do for Week 5–March 3:

  • Read: the first half of Chapter 4 (Africans in America) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (Sections 4.1-4.9 only; pages 105-147: PDF on the Readings page on Saturday poseted!).
    • Pay special attention to the subsections on The Holocaust of Enslavement, System of Enslavement, Reconstruction, Booker T. Washington, WEB DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Ida B. Wells
    • Pay special attention to Critical Thinking questions 1 and 3 on p. 185, especially the comparisons between the people named above
    • More focused questions TBA
  •  Read “African American Historians and the Reclaiming of African History” by Dr. John Henrik Clarke (PDF on the Readings page)

RESPOND to one idea in the chapter and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday March 3

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • How do Drs. Clarke and Karenga think we should approach history?
  • How does the defeat of Reconstruction shape the lives of Black people in the US?
  • What forms of resistance do Black people in the US enngage in?
  • What organizations do Black people form for advancement and resistance?
  • What differences and similarities do you see between DuBois, Washington, Garvey, and Wells-Barnett?

What’s Next?

Chapter 4, second half in Introduction to Black Studies: “Black History: Africans in America”

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 4: Black History/ African Background

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Get a copy of the two required course book if you haven’t done so already. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester.  If ordering online, you should order it now so it’ll arrive in time. Details on the books page. I’m aware of the issues with the bookstore and am looking into the situation.
  • Please sign up for the class text message service run by Remind(.com) if you haven’t done so yet
    • You can sign up online here or send a text message to (608) 467-4328 and type the following as the message: @aas166.
    • Makes it easy for me to quickly send out important messages
  • There’s a class WhatsApp group that is helpful–or so I’m told since I’m not on it. Anyhow, check it out if you haven’t yet.

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • The sessions are being recorded. Still figuring out the best way to post them. Stay tuned.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

General Announcements:

  • Lehman has emergency grants available to quickly provide money for housing, medical, food, transportation, and other needs. Details at the Student Affairs office.
  • The Lehman Food Bank offers food assistance. Details here.
  • Lehman has a very comprehensive page of students resources including laptop/tablet loans. Details here.

Events

  • Shameless self-promotion, but I’m moderating a Zoom discussion on Monday 2/22 from 7-9 PM with several members of The Last Poets: an important group of poets/activists with roots in the Black Power/Black Arts era of the 1960s-70s and still performing and writing today. It’s free: sign-up here.
  • After my event, you might want to watch the Mr. SOUL! documentary film on PBS @ 10 PM and streaming after that.

Quick highlights from third class on 2/17

  • Website review
  • Zoom wait room music: Betty Carter’s “Feed the Fire
  • Musical selection: Albert Collins’s “Snowed In.”
  • Reviewed Chapters 1 and 2 from Introduction to Black Studies
  • See the Lecture Notes page for a PDF of the slide deck presented in class (UPDATE: posted!)
  • See the video of Temple University’s Molefe Asante defining Afrocentricity on YouTube

What to do for Week 4–February 24:

READ Chapter 3 (“Black History: African Background”) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 65-102).

  • As usual, start with the Key Terms and Study Questions at the end of the chapter to guide your reading.
  • Focus on the following: the concepts of Maat, sankofa, and Sebait.
  • And the following people: Imhotep and Ptah-hotep.
  • Read the sections “The Legacy of Egypt” and “The Decline of African Societies” slowly and carefully and take good notes.
  • Connect points in this chapter to the points in section 2.6 (“Classical African Studies”) to the sections from Chapter 2 and Dr. Karenga’s reasons for the importance of Egypt and Nile Valley civilization on pp. 56-57
  • Focus on Critical Thinking questions 2,3 and 5. You don’t have to write out extensive answers, but take brief notes on each. 

RESPOND to one idea in the chapter and DISCUSS it with classmates and myself with the comment board at the bottom of this post

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday February 24

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • TBA

What’s Next?

Chapter 4 in Introduction to Black Studies: “Black History: Africans in America”

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

Week 3: Black Studies definitions, founding, and structure

Image: the sankofa bird, an Adinkra symbol translating into “return and fetch it”, meaning reaching back to the past for wisdom needed to go forward into the future.

First, a few housekeeping details:

  • Remember that this class doesn’t use Blackboard. Check the course website every week for updates and detailed reading instructions which will appear on this page
  • Get a copy of the two required course book if you haven’t done so already. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester.  If ordering online, you should order it now so it’ll arrive in time. Details on the books page. I’m aware of the issues with the bookstore and am looking into the situation.
  • Sato has generously volunteered to provide copies of this week’s reading for anyone who doesn’t have the book yet: see the class WhatsApp group for details
  • Please sign up for the class text message service run by Remind(.com) if you haven’t done so yet
    • You can sign up online here or send a text message to (608) 467-4328 and type the following as the message: @aas166.
    • Makes it easy for me to quickly send out important messages–like today when I was way too sick to run my classes

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • The sessions will be recorded starting from now on: still figuring out the best way to post them. Stay tuned.
  • Sign-up info for weekly Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

General Announcements:

  • Lehman has emergency grants available to quickly provide money for housing, medical, food, transportation, and other needs. Details at the Student Affairs office.
  • The Lehman Food Bank offers food assistance. Details here.
  • Lehman has a very comprehensive page of students resources including laptop/tablet loans. Details here.

Quick highlights from second class on 2/10

  • Website review
  • Zoom wait room music: Herbie Hancock’s “Maiden Voyage
  • Musical selection: Kamasi Washington’s “Change of the Guard.”
  • Re-reading of Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (handout and also on the Readings page). What’s his view of a Black Studies methodology (i.e. ways to analyze information and do research) and how should it approach the world?
  • Reviewed key points of the Dr. John Henrik Clarke documentary A Great and Mighty Walk. It’s on YouTube if you want a refresher. (Consider sharing the link with your own intro to it on social media. Think about watching it with family members, your church group, tenants’ association, PTA chapter, etc.)

What to do for Week 3–February 17:

READ Chapters 1 and 2 in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 1-60).

  • Skim (read quickly and to gain an overview) pp 1-17 on history and development of the discipline.
  • Focus (read carefully and closely) on the following sections: (pp 17-27) 1.3 (Relevance of the Discipline) and 1.4 (Scope of the Discipline) and sections 2.3-2.7 — the different developmental initiatives.
  • Read only pp 39-60 (“Developmental Initiatives”) in chapter 2
  • This book is on reserve at Lehman’s library if yours doesn’t arrive in time.
  • Pay special attention to section 2.6 (“Classical African Studies”). Focus on pp. 54-57, particularly the section on Cheikh Anta Diop.
    • Know why Diop is a significant figure and his intellectual contributions.
    • Also be able to explain Karenga’s reasons for the importance of Egypt and Nile Valley civilization on pp. 56-57

RESPOND to the questions at the bottom of this post and DISCUSS them with classmates and myself

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday February 17

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • What is worldview?
  • What’s the importance of worldview to the discipline of Africana Studies?
  • How does the origin of the discipline shape the approach?
  • How does the issue of relevance shape the discipline?
  • Why is Cheikh Anta Diop important to Africana Studies?

What’s Next?

Chapter 3 in Introduction to Black Studies: “Black History: African Background”

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

 

Spring 21 Week 2: Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s Great and Mighty Walk

Hi everyone,

Expect a new post here every week with full details on what to do. Posts will usually go live on Thursdays.

First a few housekeeping things before we get to the assignment itself. There’s a lot in this week’s post but there’s a lot to cover. It will be shorter after the first few weeks.

  • You might find it helpful to subscribe to new posts for this site: use the e-mail sign-up form on the main page.
  • If you’re new to the class, welcome! Be sure to carefully review class policies on the syllabus.
  • Get copies of the required course book: Dr. Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies, 4th edition.. You will need it to do the reading assignments for the rest of the semester. You can also buy the book directly from the publisher at the list price. See links on the books page.

Please sign up for the class text message service run by Remind(.com) if you haven’t done so yet

  • You can sign up online here or send a text message to (608) 467-4328 and type the following as the message: @aas166.
  • Makes it easy for me to quickly send out important messages–like today when I was way too sick to run my classes

On the weekly Zoom sessions:

  • The sessions will be recorded starting next week: still figuring out the best way to post them. Stay tuned.
  • Sign-up info for both Zoom sessions is on the Zoom meet info page. I recommend saving the meeting ID and password in your calendar or elsewhere to easily join

General Announcements:

  • Lehman has emergency grants available to quickly provide money for housing, medical, food, transportation, and other needs. Details at the Student Affairs office.
  • The Lehman Food Bank offers food assistance. Details here.
  • Lehman has a very comprehensive page of students resources including laptop/tablet loans. Details here.

Audio tour of this website

If you missed the first class session, this short tour of the site and the syllabus should get you up to speed. Also see the FAQ page for more info. This lecture is optional: if you were in the Zoom session or can grasp the website, you can skip it.

[coming this weekend.]

Quick highlights from first class on 2/3:

  • Course Intro & syllabus overview
  • Zoom wait room music: Archie Shepp’s “New Africa
  • Musical selection: Dizzy Gillespie’s “Swing Low, Sweet Cadillac.”
  • Reading of Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (handout and also on the Readings page). What’s his view of a Black Studies methodology (i.e. ways to analyze information and do research) and how should it approach the world?
  • Screened first ~25 minutes of the Dr. John Henrik Clarke documentary A Great and Mighty Walk. It’s on YouTube if you want a refresher. (Consider sharing the link with your own intro to it on social media. Think about watching it with family members, your church group, tenants’ association, PTA chapter, etc.)

What to do for Week 2–February 8:

RE-READ Dr. Leonard Jeffries Jr’s “The Essence of Black Studies” (on the Readings page. Password hint: what year is it?).

WATCH the 90-minute documentary embedded below of the late scholar Dr. John Henrik Clarke

RESPOND to the questions at the bottom of this post and DISCUSS them with classmates and myself

ATTEND the weekly Zoom session @ 6 PM EST on Wednesday February 10

Things to think about while viewing and for discussion:

  • What is Dr. Clarke’s view of history and how should we relate to it?
  • Why study ancient African civilizations, especially Kemet and Nile Valley civilization, according to Dr. Clarke?
  • How, according to Dr. Clarke, has the history of Kemet’s contributions to Greek civilization been erased?
  • Consider sharing the link on your social media feed and watching it with friends, family, children or hosting a watch party for your PTA, church group, tenants’ association, etc.

Note: the video takes a sweeping view of history and Dr. Clarke includes an astounding amount of information. Don’t try to take down everything: focus on some key points or maybe a few figures to look at in more detail later. The goal is to gain a broad grasp of a key foundational figure in Africana Studies and think about his approach to history.

Highlight or underline key points in Dr. J’s essay. Write down notes as you read and watch the documentary. Write down questions of things you don’t understand for us to answer in class.

What’s Next?

We’ll review highlights of the Dr. Clarke documentary, discuss Africana Studies methodology, and revisit Dr. J’s essay.

Comments on posts:

You’ll notice the “Let’s Talk” button is below. Here’s how it’ll work: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.