NIGHT section week 14: Black Psychology Part 1

Photo: Dr. Wade Nobles

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE NIGHT SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site

 

Quick highlights from Week 13 (11/21)’s class:

  • Reviewed Chapter 7 on Black Economics in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages ).
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • Musical intro: Wu Tang Clan’s “C.R.E.A.M.” Listen on YouTube
  • News story–Bloomberg: “How America’s Wealth Gap Shaped the Modern Economy” (YouTube)
  • RESOURCE: National Urban League’s “State of Black America” Report. Here

DO THIS for week 13–Monday November 28

For this week, there are 3 texts: 1) part of chapter 10 (Black Psychology) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies 2) an article from Dr. Wade Nobles 3) a video from Dr. Joy DeGruy.

1-READ the first half of chapter 10 (Black Psychology-pp. 397-407–10 pages) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies which has the following sections:

  • Intro and historical origins (10.1, 10.2)
  • 3 major schools: differences between approaches (10.3)

We’ll read the second half (different theorists in the “Radical School”) next week.

2-READ Dr. Wade Nobles’s article “Fractured Consciousness, Shattered Identity: Black Psychology and the Restoration of the African Psyche” from the Journal of Black Psychology. 9 pages. PDF linked here. (Courtesy of his website.)

3-WATCH Dr. Joy DeGruy introduce her theory of Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome:

4-(OPTIONAL)-Dr. Wade Nobles’s article “From Black Psychology to Sakhu Djaer: Implications for the Further Development of a Pan African Psychology” from the Journal of Black Psychology. PDF link here.

What to read for:

Chapter 10 gives an overview of the broad field of Black Psychology. It starts with a brief overview of the history followed by specific examples of practitioners who began to shape the response to their field, followed by the developments of the 1970s and beyond where a more defined response rooted in culture and experiences of African people outside of dominant theories takes hold. This week, focus on understanding the structure of the field and history from the reading in the textbook. For the reading and video by Drs. Nobles and DeGruy, think about their theories of collective trauma and how this shapes overall responses. If there are any psychology or social work majors, think about how this approach might shape your own ways of operating.

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

Additional Resources:

What’s Next?

Chapter 8 (Psychology) part 2 in Introduction to Black Studies

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DAY section week 14: Black Politics, continued

Photo: Shirley Chisholm—the first African American woman elected to Congress. (Image courtesy of Women Make Movies)

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE DAY SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE NIGHT SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site

Course Announcements:

  • NO CLASS MEETING ON WEDNESDAY 11/23 (Day before the big holiday. Check schedules for you other classes, which might still meet)
  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Monday/Wednesday from 4-5 PM! on Zoom here. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. Or drop by Carman 291.

Quick highlights from Week 12 (11/14, 11/16)’s class:

  • COINTINUED the parts of Chapter 7 on the Black politics in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies
  • My lecture notes are in the usual spot

DO THIS for week 14

Monday November 28

Read SECTIONS of chapter 7 (Black Politics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies.

Read sections 7.4,(The Jackson Campaign) 7.5 (The Historic Election of Barack Hussein Obama), and 7.6  (Black Elected Officials) for Monday

WATCH my interview on Eric Adams (40 Minutes) [Different video coming soon]
Wednesday November 30

FINISH Chapter 7: Read sections 7.7 (interest Group Politics)) 7.8 (Coalitions and Alliances)

What to read for:

Chapter 7 takes a broad look at political engagement from Kemet to the experience in the US. Think about what rooting political responses in ancient texts does. Review the “Crusian Paradigm” from chapter 6 on social organization and think about how that relates to/shapes political engagement. Also think about how the chapter frames political engagement as more than just the electoral process–and indeed what goes into the electoral process behind the scenes.

Focus on the expectations of Black elected officials and then compare that with the limitations on what they can sometimes do

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Second half of chapter 7 (Politics) in Introduction to Black Studies

DAY section week 13: Black Politics

Photo: It’s Nation Time. Amiri Baraka. Black Forum Records (Motown). 1972.

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE DAY SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site

Course Announcements:

  • IN-CLASS QUIZ ON SECTIONS OF CHAPTER 6 MONDAY 11/21! [Note new and final date!]
    • Sections 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, and 6.7
    • Focus on Ghetto/ghettoization, race, class, culture, pathology, Black family, and relations and quality relations & “the connections”
  • NO CLASS MEETING ON WEDNESDAY 11/23 (Day before the big holiday. Check schedules for you other classes, which might still meet)
  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Monday/Wednesday from 4-5 PM! on Zoom here. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. Or drop by Carman 291.

Quick highlights from Week 12 (11/14, 11/16)’s class:

DO THIS for week 13

Monday November 21

Quiz on sections of chapter 6

Read SECTIONS of chapter 7 (Black Politics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies.

Read sections 7.2 (Politics in the US Context) and -7.3 (Party politics) for Monday

Wednesday November 23

Class will not meet.

What to read for:

Chapter 7 takes a broad look at political engagement from Kemet to the experience in the US. Think about what rooting political responses in ancient texts does. Review the “Crusian Paradigm” from chapter 6 on social organization and think about how that relates to/shapes political engagement. Also think about how the chapter frames political engagement as more than just the electoral process–and indeed what goes into the electoral process behind the scenes.

Focus on the expectations of Black elected officials and then compare that with the limitations on what they can sometimes do

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Second half of chapter 7 (Politics) in Introduction to Black Studies

NIGHT section week 13: Black Economics

Jacob Lawrence (1917 – 2000) “The Carpenters” 1946

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE NIGHT SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site
  • Conference of the Midwest regional chapter of ASCAC (Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations) runs from November 18-20 online. Details and registration here

Course Announcements:

  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Monday/Wednesday from 4-5 PM! on Zoom here. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. Or drop by Carman 291.

Quick highlights from Week 12 (11/14)’s class:

  • NPR News story: “Birth Workers in Kansas are Addressing the State’s High Rate of Infant Mortality.” Here. Links made to chapter 6
  • Reviewed Chapter 7 on Black politics in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies
  • Lecture notes posted in the usual spot
  • Musical intro: Comedy duo Key and Peele’s “Obama Meet and Greet” skit. Extra: Richard Pryor’s “The First Black President” skit from his TV variety show (1977)

DO THIS for week 13–Monday November 21

READ all of chapter 8 (Black Economics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. (Approx. 25 pages)

What to read for:

TBA

ATTEND the class on Monday November 21

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

Additional Resources:

What’s Next?

TBA

Comments on posts:

Scroll all the way to the bottom of the post for the “Leave a Comment” button below. Here’s how it works: you can use this to discuss points raised here.  A few points:

  • Your first comment will have to be approved by me: after that, you can comment without approval
  • Comments section will only be open to enrolled students
  • You have to leave your name (enter as first name and last initial only) so a) I can make sure only people in the class are commenting and b) you get credit for the comment
  • Remember to be respectful, especially when responding to classmates
  • The comments section closes 14 days after a post goes live

To ‘participate’ in the class, I’d like to see everyone 1) post a substantive comment of their own based on either the reading or my lecture using some of the questions raised or conversation prompts, and 2) to respond thoughtfully to someone else’s comment—not just agree/disagree, but add on evidence or ask a follow-up question. You can also ask a question–for me or others–but that doesn’t count toward your comment and reply needed for the grade. It’s fine with me if conversation continues in a thread as long as it does, but two responses showing a clear engagement with the reading will count for being ‘present.’ Does that make sense? You have two weeks to write those two comments for credit.

DAY section week 12: Black Politics

Photo: It’s Nation Time. Amiri Baraka. Black Forum Records (Motown). 1972.

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE DAY SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site

Course Announcements:

  • IN-CLASS QUIZ ON SECTIONS OF CHAPTER 6 NEXT MONDAY 11/14! [Postponed to WEDNESDAY 11/16]
    • Sections 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, and 6.7
    • Focus on Ghetto/ghettoization, race, class, culture, pathology, Black family, and relations and quality relations & “the connections”
  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Monday/Wednesday from 4-5 PM! on Zoom here. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. Or drop by Carman 291.

Quick highlights from Week 11 (11/7)’s class:

DO THIS for week 12

Monday November 14

Read SECTIONS of chapter 7 (Black Politics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies.

Read sections 7.1-7.4 for Monday

Wednesday November 16

Read sections 7.5-7.8 for Wednesday–FINISH the chapter

What to read for:

Chapter 7 takes a broad look at political engagement from Kemet to the experience in the US. Think about what rooting political responses in ancient texts does. Review the “Crusian Paradigm” from chapter 6 on social organization and think about how that relates to/shapes political engagement. Also think about how the chapter frames political engagement as more than just the electoral process–and indeed what goes into the electoral process behind the scenes.

 

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Chapter 8 (Psychology) (Economics) in Introduction to Black Studies

NIGHT section week 12: Black Politics

Photo: It’s Nation Time. Amiri Baraka. Black Forum Records (Motown). 1972.

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE NIGHT SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site
  • Conference of the Midwest regional chapter of ASCAC (Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations) runs from November 18-20 online. Details and registration here

Course Announcements:

  • IN-CLASS QUIZ ON SECTIONS OF CHAPTER 6 NEXT MONDAY 11/14!
    • Sections 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, and 6.7
    • Focus on Ghetto/ghettoization, race, class, culture, pathology, Black family, and relations and quality relations & “the connections”
  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Monday/Wednesday from 4-5 PM! on Zoom here. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. Or drop by Carman 291.

Quick highlights from Week 11 (11/7)’s class:

DO THIS for week 12–Monday November 14

Read all of chapter 7 (Black Politics) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies.

What to read for:

Chapter 7 takes a broad look at political engagement from Kemet to the experience in the US. Think about what rooting political responses in ancient texts does. Review the “Crusian Paradigm” from chapter 6 on social organization and think about how that relates to/shapes political engagement. Also think about how the chapter frames political engagement as more than just the electoral process–and indeed what goes into the electoral process behind the scenes.

ATTEND class @ 6 PM on Monday November 14

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Chapter 8 (Psychology) in Introduction to Black Studies

NIGHT section Week 11: Black relationships and Africana Womanism

Image: Friends. Elizabeth Catlett (1915-2012). via Princeton University Art Museum collection.

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE NIGHT SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • Early voting runs from October 29-November 6. See the Board of Elections site for info on voting early or to submit an absentee ballot to avoid voting in person.
  • NY African Diaspora International Film Festival runs from 11/25-12/11. course-related highlights are documentaries on Lowndes County (11/26, 29), Ella Baker (Schomburg, 11/29),  Fannie Lou Hamer (Schomburg, 11/29), Sonia Sanchez (Baruch College, 11/30). Early reservations are highly recommended–especially for free documentary film screenings! Details at their site
  • Conference of the Midwest regional chapter of ASCAC (Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations) runs from November 18-20 online. Details and registration here

Course Announcements:

  • this semester. Details here.
  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Monday/Wednesday from 4-5 PM! on Zoom here. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. Or drop by Carman 291.

Quick highlights from Week 10 (10/31)’s class:

  • Reviewed the parts of Chapter 6 on sociology and the Black Family  in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 250-268).
  • NPR story on the changing racial disparities in COVID cases here
  • My lecture notes are in the usual spot
  • Resource/for further reading: Joyce Ladner The Death of White Sociology
  • Music: Salt n’ Pepa’s “Heaven or Hell”: on YouTube here (with an excellent video)
  • See the PBS series Race: the Power of an Illusion for a quick overview of housing segregation/wealth accumulation in the US. Lots of good stuff at the companion website. Housing discrimination in the US by official government policy as an example of institutional racism (racism supported/done by official institutions/governments.) See a 30-minute clip on Vimeo.

DO THIS for week 11–Monday November 7

(RE?) READ Joyce Ladner’s essay, “Tomorrow’s Tomorrow: the Black Woman” (PDF on the Readings page). We’ll start with this on Monday night!

Finish chapter 6 in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. Read last part of the chapter (pp. 268-285) on the various feminisms/womanisms and the section on relationships, with a focus on “the connections.”

What to read for:

The second half of chapter 6 deals with varying approaches to gender studies and relationships in Africana Studies. Think about how the foundation of quality relationships is framed here.

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Chapter 7 (Politics) in Introduction to Black Studies

DAY section Week 11: Black relationships and Africana Womanism and Black Politics

Image: Friends. Elizabeth Catlett (1915-2012). via Princeton University Art Museum collection.

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE DAY SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE NIGHT SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

General Announcements:

  • Early runs from October 29-November 6. See the Board of Elections site for info on voting early or to submit an absentee ballot to avoid voting in person.

Course Announcements:

  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Monday/Wednesday from 4-5 PM! on Zoom here. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. Or drop by Carman 291.

Quick highlights from Week 10 (10/31, 11/2)’s classes:

  • Reviewed the parts of Chapter 6 on sociology and the Black Family  in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies (pages 250-268).
  • NPR story on the changing racial disparities in COVID cases here
  • My lecture notes are in the usual spot
  • Resource/for further reading: Joyce Ladner The Death of White Sociology
  • See the PBS series Race: the Power of an Illusion for a quick overview of housing segregation/wealth accumulation in the US. Lots of good stuff at the companion website. Housing discrimination in the US by official government policy as an example of institutional racism (racism supported/done by official institutions/governments.) See a 30-minute clip on Vimeo.

DO THIS for week 11

Monday November 7

RE-READ sections 6.4 and 6.5 of chapter 6 on culture and family. We’ll start with this on Monday!

Finish chapter 6  (sections 6.6 and 6.7) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. Read last part of the chapter (pp. 268-285) on the various feminisms/womanisms and the section on relationships, with a focus on “the connections.”

What to read for:

The second half of chapter 6 deals with varying approaches to gender studies and relationships in Africana Studies. Think about how the foundation of quality relationships is framed here.

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Wednesday November 9

READ sections 7.2-7.6 on politics in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies.

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Chapter 7 (Politics) in Introduction to Black Studies

DAY section Week 10: Black Religion/ Sociology

Image: US American Black. Faith Ringgold. via artist’s website. 1969. Oil on canvas. 60 x 84″. From Ringgold’s “Black Light” series.

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE DAY SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE NIGHT SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

First, a few housekeeping details:

Course Announcements:

  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Monday/Wednesday from 4-5 PM! on Zoom here. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. Or drop by Carman 291.

Quick highlights from Week 9 (10/24, 26):

  • Reviewed the first part of Chapter 5–ancient African spiritual traditions in Introduction to Black Studies

Do this for week 10: October 31/ November 2

For Monday October 31

  • Read the sections of chapter 5 on the social ethics of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (pages TBA) and the Nation of Islam/Malcolm X
  • READ THESE PAGES for Monday: 214-222, 224 (The Christian tradition, Social ethics of Martin Luther King, Black Liberation Theology, Summary on p. 224). 228-229, 232-236: Muslim tradition, Nation of Islam, social ethics of Malcolm X

What to read for:

Focus on how Dr. King, the Nation of Islam, and Malcolm X all interpret religious/spiritual traditions and how these are specific to the Black community. Understand how Christianity and Islam shape Black life

For Wednesday November 2

  • Read up to section 6.6 (pp. 249-268) of chapter 6 (Black Sociology) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. (18 pages total)

What to read for:

The first half of chapter 6 deals with social science approaches of studying/analyzing Black communities, families, and life. Think about how the approaches presented deal with issues of methodology (how research is done and what questions are asked), impartiality and objectivity in research, and the relationship of the researcher to the subject. Try to understand:

  • Issues of ghettoization
  • culture and the different models
  • issues of studying Black family relations and the various approaches

ATTEND class on Monday and Wednesday

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Second half of Chapter 6 in Introduction to Black Studies

NIGHT section Week 10: Black Sociology

Image: US American Black. Faith Ringgold. via artist’s website. 1969. Oil on canvas. 60 x 84″. From Ringgold’s “Black Light” series.

NOTE THAT THIS IS THE UPDATE FOR THE NIGHT SECTION: IF YOU’RE IN THE DAY SECTION, SEE THE POST FOR YOUR CLASS

First, a few housekeeping details:

Course Announcements:

  • Take-home Midterm due Next Tuesday 11/1! Details on the Assignments page where you can download the assignment as a PDF file
  • Use the submissions page to turn it in when done.
  • Lehman College’s ACE Center offers writing tutoring and is operating via Zoom this semester. Details here.
  • Prof. Williams Zoom live chat hours: Monday/Wednesday from 4-5 PM! on Zoom here. Or call: +1 929 205 6099 then add meeting ID: 528 450 5381. Or drop by Carman 291.

Quick highlights from Week 9 (10/24):

  • Reviewed Chapter 5 in Introduction to Black Studies
  • Reviewed Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s essay “Image and Mind Control in the African World.”
  • Announced first assignment: see the Assignments page for details
  • See the Lecture Notes page for a copy of my presentation
  • Music: Sister Rosetta Tharpe: “This Train”–on YouTube here

Do this for week 10: October 31

COMPLETE AND SUBMIT your midterm exam (PDF on the Assignments page) on or before Tuesday November 1 (the day AFTER class meets)

For Monday’s class, (Week 10), there are two readings to do.

  • Read up to section 6.6 (pp. 249-268) of chapter 6 (Black Sociology) in Maulana Karenga’s Introduction to Black Studies. (18 pages total)
  • Joyce Ladner’s “Tomorrow’s Tomorrow: The Black Woman” from The Death of White Sociology. (15 pages: PDF document on the Readings page

What to read for:

The first half of chapter 6 deals with social science approaches of studying/analyzing Black communities, families, and life. Think about how the approaches presented deal with issues of methodology (how research is done and what questions are asked), impartiality and objectivity in research, and the relationship of the researcher to the subject. Try to understand:

  • Issues of ghettoization
  • culture and the different models
  • issues of studying Black family relations and the various approaches

From the PDF reading, think about how Ladner critiques dominant social science theories of approaching research. Reflect on how these issues have been presented in your own classes.

ATTEND class on Monday March 2

General reading strategies:

  • Underline/highlight key points in the text
  • Use the reading questions at the back of chapters to focus you: read those first
  • Try to understand the definitions of the key concepts listed at the back of the chapter
  • Make a note to ask the instructor to clarify anything you don’t understand
  • Note key issues, approaches, and dilemmas/challenges Dr. Karenga outlines

Discussion questions

  • See chapter/essay highlights above

What’s Next?

Second half of Chapter 6 in Introduction to Black Studies